Cedarcide blog post image, 10 surprising places bugs could be hiding in your home


Sooo you might not want to hear this, but there are definitely bugs hiding in your home, whether you see them or not. Normally it’s no big deal, a few beneficial bug-eating spiders here or there. But sometimes you’re not so lucky, and your hidden bugs are a costly problem just waiting to happen. Food, water, and shelter—these are the reasons bugs move indoors, and because our homes provide all three, every household has at least a few critters crawling around somewhere.

But if we don’t see them, where could they be hiding? Here are some surprising but also common places bugs hide in our homes.

 

Three things bugs really like: moisture, warmth, and a dark place to hide. Whether it’s your basement or a designated closet, your hot water heater provides all three. Periodically check around and under your water heater tank for signs of millipedes, centipedes, pillbugs, silverfish, spiders, crickets, and ants. If you notice any leaks or unexpected moisture, clean it up immediately and correct the issue to avoid future problems. 

Solution: To kill any bugs you find, give them a quick spray with Cedarcide Original. To repel future bugs, spray baseboards, shelving, and known trouble spots with Cedarcide Original every other week.

 

Bathrooms not only provide water but also warmth, and that added humidity really helps draw in the creepy crawlies. Thoroughly check your bathroom’s cabinetry and drains for signs of cockroaches, crickets, silverfish, and ants, and if you’re currently struggling with roaches or ants, make sure to dry both your bathroom and your shower’s flooring after each use. Entire populations of roaches and ants can often sustain themselves on just this water alone. 

Solution: If you’re experiencing heavy pest traffic, hand drying your shower and sinks after each use may be necessary. For less severe problems, simply spray any bugs you spot with family-safe Cedarcide Original. Spray suspected entry points and known hangouts every other week to repel bugs from the area.

 

The next time you’re doing a deep clean, make sure to pull your appliances out from the wall. Not only does grime collect here that can cause pest issues later, but there’s a good chance bugs have already set up shop there. Crumbs, darkness, privacy, and often moisture are in great supply behind and under appliances like fridges and dishwashers, making them a common hideout for roaches, flies, ants, and other hungry insects. 

Don’t be surprised if you find bugs inside your fridge, too—yep, you read that right: inside! It’s not uncommon for fruit flies and roaches to crawl inside your fridge, feast and breed for a few days, and then sneak out when you’re not looking. 

Solution: Cleanliness is key. Periodically clean inside, outside, behind, and under your appliances to limit bug attractants like moisture, dirt, and food debris. A quick spray of non-toxic Cedarcide Original will take care of any bugs you come across in the process. 

 

It should come as no surprise that trash and recycling bins are a popular gathering place for all sorts of bugs. The abundance of food and shelter brings not only expected visitors like flies, roaches, and ants, but also predatory bugs, such as spiders, sometimes even scorpions. 

What might be more surprising, though, is that not only do bugs hang out in your garbage, they can thrive there, too. In other words, your trash and recycling might not just occasionally feed bugs, it could be the very source of your home’s pest problems, sustaining entire populations of hungry bugs hidden inside. 

Solution: Taking your trash out often, switching to bins with sealable lids, and cleaning those bins weekly should take care of any trash or recycling-dwelling pests you might have.

 

You know what bugs enjoy almost as much as food and water? Clutter. And your junk drawer is crammed full of it. In addition to cleaning your junk drawers at least annually, check it periodically for signs of spiders, roaches, ants, silverfish, and other unwanted guests. 

Solution: Do yourself a favor and just finally get around to cleaning out your junk drawers. Recycle or donate duplicate items and throw all those sauce packets and disposable utensils you should have dumped years ago. Keeping things organized and clean should do the trick.

 

Your dirty laundry and even clean piles of clothes could be concealing some unknown roommates. Carpet beetles, silverfish, firebrats, roaches, crickets, and moths commonly hide out in disorganized clothing and bedding. The scent of sweat, skin oils, spilled food and drinks attracts a wide array of interested insects, which can ultimately lead to hundreds of dollars of damage.

Solution: Stay up on your laundry and avoid piling clothes, bedding, and other textiles, even if they’re clean. Check fabrics for signs of bugs before storing them for the season and wash as needed. Using bags or bins with airtight seals should shield your clothing from pest damage during the offseason

 

Your electrical outlets and outlet covers might be hiding more than just wiring. Ants, several types of beetles, and more are known to take up residence in these surprising locations. Look for small wood shavings and other signs of subtle wall damage—these are common symptoms of infested outlets. 

Solution: Remove any covers you suspect might be hiding pests, carefully clean out the space, and repair or replace parts as needed

 

Before bringing home any new plant babies, inspect them for signs of bugs, like webbing, eggs, larva, and of course any adult insects. Surprisingly, houseplants are a common avenue for bugs to enter our homes. It’s a smart practice to quarantine any new houseplant additions apart from your other plants for at least a month after bringing them home. Not only will this save your other plants in case the new one contains damaging bugs, but it will also make it easier to monitor it for any hidden pests. 

Solution: Check out these quick reads on killing and repelling common houseplant pests:

 

This one gives us chills. Who would have thought that the cute stuffed animals we grew up sleeping and cuddling with might have been host to a whole range of yucky critters? Carpet beetles, silverfish, firebrats, roaches, crickets, spiders, moths—any of these could be hiding inside or on the outside of your favorite teddy bear. 

Solution: Wash frequently used stuffed animals at least once every few weeks and apply family-safe Cedarcide Original repellent as needed.

 

New and old cardboard is a huge attractant for countless insects, arachnids, and other crawling things, including scorpions, crickets, silverfish, and roaches. 

Solution: Make the switch to sealable plastic boxes or bins and you should be covered.

Cedarcide blog post image, How to Get Rid of Scorpions: 3 Steps

Can you imagine a scorpion crawling into your bed at night? What about slipping on a pair of shoes only to find a scorpion hiding down inside? This might sound like the stuff of nightmares, but if you’re living in the Southwest, it’s just part of your day-to-day.

Although they’re usually no more harmful than a wasp or spider bite, scorpion stings can be life threatening to our children, pets, and elderly. The bark scorpion, for example, which lives throughout Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Mexico, is the most venomous scorpion in North America. In just the last few decades, over a 1,000 people and pets have died from their excruciating sting. 

Thankfully, you don’t have to worry about any of that, because you’re about to learn how to keep scorpions away from your lawn and out of your home, without resorting to poisonous pesticides! Here are 3 steps to kill and repel scorpions:

 

Scorpions only enter our lawns and homes if they offer shelter, food, or water. Removing these attractants is the first step to controlling scorpions

REMOVE THEIR SHELTER

Scorpions need dark, cool places to hide in order to escape sunlight, as they’re sensitive to heat and prone to dehydration. Limiting these potential hiding spots comes down to cleanliness and clutter—and can substantially decrease scorpion populations.

Firstly, lawn maintenance is key. Keeping grass and shrubbery well-trimmed and off your home (scorpions use vegetation as bridges into houses) is essential. Removing outdoor clutter like unused lawn equipment and organic debris, such as wood piles and brush, is equally important.

For best results, you’ll need to maintain a clean and clutter-free home, too. Cleanliness matters because grime and food debris attracts bugs, which are the primary food source for scorpions. Clutter—like piles of magazines, clothing, newspapers, and scattered boxes—matters because scorpions will use these areas to hide and thrive inside your home.

REMOVE THEIR FOOD

Again, scorpions eat other bugs. In other words, if you want to repel scorpions, you’ll need to get rid of any bugs living in your lawn and home. 

To kill and repel outdoor bugs, apply family and pet-safe PCO Choice to your yard monthly from February to November. To kill bugs inside your home, give them a quick spray with non-toxic Cedarcide Original. To repel indoor bugs, apply Cedarcide Original to common insect trouble spots and entryways, such as door frames, window sills, baseboards, countertops, etc.

REMOVE MOISTURE

As mentioned earlier, scorpions are vulnerable to dehydration. Deny them water by checking both inside and outside for sources of unnecessary moisture, like standing water, leaky plumbing, A/C units, hoses, faucets, etc. Removing or repairing these items will help considerably.

 

Surprising fact: scorpions can sneak into almost any opening the size of a credit card. No wonder they’re so good at finding ways into our homes! Locating and sealing potential entry points is crucial if you’re ready to stop seeing scorpions inside.

Start by doing a slow and thorough check both inside and outside for possible entryways like cracks, crevices, holes, etc. Look closely at windows, doorways, baseboards, fixtures, outlets, foundations, basements, and attics. You might want to consider installing seals at the bottom of doors and garages, too. It might sound tedious, but if you’re struggling with scorpions, it could mean the difference between a scorpion-free home and enduring an extremely painful sting or the loss of your pet. 

If—or more likely when—you find any such openings, promptly seal them with caulk or another appropriate sealant.

 

Unfortunately, if you’ve seen a scorpion inside or outside your home, chances are there are dozens more hidden throughout your property.

TREAT YOUR LAWN

Now that your lawn is decluttered and free of debris, it’s time to spray it for scorpions. Start by spraying both your front and back yards, as well as all shrubbery, with PCO Choice to kill and help repel scorpions. Repeat this process again in two weeks, and then proceed to monthly applications after that. If you’ve yet to see a scorpion and this is just for prevention, you can move on to monthly applications right from the start. For best results, we suggest monthly applications all year long.

Because PCO Choice is plant-based and family-safe, no downtime is necessary. You, your family, and pets can enjoy your lawn right after application!

Want added protection? We suggest spreading Cedar Granules throughout your lawn, too.


TREAT YOUR HOME

Traditional indoor bug sprays can fill your home with long-lasting poisons that could seriously harm the health of you, your family, and pets. In fact, these products usually do more harm than good, as you’re usually better off having the scorpions in your house than toxic chemicals. For killing and preventing scorpions indoors, we suggest plant-based Cedarcide Original, which can be safely sprayed all throughout your home.

To kill any scorpions you find inside, give them a quick spray with family-safe Cedarcide Original. To help prevent them from coming back, also spray known entry points and hiding spots weekly. Repeat as needed.

 

 

 

Scorpions are one of our planet’s great survivors. From scorching temperatures to below-freezing conditions, scorpions can thrive in almost any environment. It can be very difficult to get rid of scorpions.

Having existed for over 400 million years, there are now over 1,700 species of scorpion—these predatory arachnids can be found on every continent in the world except for Antarctica. In the U.S., scorpions are mostly limited to the Southwest, such as Arizona, Texas, California and New Mexico.

Unfortunately for those living in these areas, scorpions can be difficult to eliminate. In fact, some scorpions can go anywhere from six to twelve months without food, and because they’re nocturnal and active almost exclusively at night, they can be hard to properly control.

The good news, however, is that scorpions are not nearly as dangerous as people think, with most encounters being no more harmful than a bee or wasp sting. The better news is that by taking preventative measures and using various natural methods, a scorpion problem can be prevented or outright solved. Follows these 8 simple guidelines to get rid of scorpions naturally.

The first and most crucial step to controlling scorpions is general pest and insect control. By removing the scorpions’ food source, you can send these venomous arachnids packing.

When it comes to scorpions, we advise creating a repellent barrier around both your house and yard using an eco-friendly, non-toxic outdoor pesticide. Be sure to spray around your home’s foundation and along fence lines (this treatment should be done twice a month until the problem is resolved).

Non-toxic indoor pesticides can be used to kill individuals that have found their way into the home, and as a preventative measure to treat doorways, windowsills and baseboards

Keeping a clean and well-organized yard will go along way toward safeguarding your home against scorpions. Vulnerable to dehydration—and therefore extreme heat and sun exposure—scorpions require shady, cool places to hide during the daytime before emerging to hunt at night. Make sure to do the following:

  • Keep bushes and small trees landscaped. Do not allow them to overgrow and touch the outside walls of your home—scorpions use these as bridges to enter through windows or other small openings.
  • Keep grass & other vegetation short and trim.
  • De-clutter your yard, removing all unnecessary items: including brush, debris, decorative rocks, woodpiles, lawn equipment, etc.

Just as crucial as de-cluttering your yard is keeping your home clean and organized. Clean—because crumbs attract bugs which in turn attract predators like scorpions. Organized—because scorpions will use everything from shoes to boxes to piles of clothing to hide. Traditionally cluttered spaces like closets and underneath beds will require attention, too.

Scorpions require openings no bigger than a credit card to enter your home. Windows, baseboards, doorways, light-switches, outlets, fixtures, wall & foundation cracks, and even ceiling fans are all potential scorpion entrances. Seal your home by remedying these cracks and openings using caulk (don’t forget to check basements and attics, too!). The same process should be repeated outdoors as well, paying close attention to the roof and any foundation/wall cracks & holes. Screens or seals should be used to ensure windows and doorways remain firmly shut, too. This will help get rid of scorpions in your home.

Scorpions are prone to moisture loss and usually enter homes as a way to find water or cool down. Whether inside or outside your home, it’s important to remove puddles, standing water, and any other sources of moisture. Plumbing, basements and crawl spaces should also be kept dry and free of leaks.

Those sticky traps used to catch mice and small rats can be re-purposed as scorpion traps. Place them along common entryways, near possible water sources, and in other dark, cool spaces like closets and underneath furniture. Caution: some sticky traps contain synthetic pesticides and other toxins; for the safety of your pets and family, be sure to only purchase the non-toxic versions.

A moistened burlap sack makes for an effective scorpion trap. Simply wet the sack and place it in scorpion trouble areas like basements, attics or just outside your home. Leave the bag opened and in place overnight and check it in the morning (be extremely careful when checking both inside and underneath the bag—scorpions pack a nasty sting!). Repeat this process until you no longer see scorpions in or around your home & lawn.

Lavender, cinnamon, peppermint and cedar are all essential oils said to deter scorpions. These can be diluted with a carrier oil (or smaller amounts of water) and sprayed along scorpion problem areas and entry points—such as baseboards, windowsills, doorways, and around the perimeter of your home.

Scorpion Shield Indoor Protection

Scorpion Shield is a naturally sourced insecticide and repellent for indoor scorpion control.

  • Made from all natural cedar
  • Ready-to-use
  • Dries quickly and will not stain
  • Fresh cedar scent