Cedarcide

Posts Tagged ‘moths’

How to Get Rid of Moths and Prevent their Damage: 3 Steps

Cedarcide blog post image, How to get rid of moths and prevent their damage: 3 steps

So you noticed a hole in one of your sweaters, or maybe just a single moth flying around your home. These might not seem like a big deal, but they’re a sign you have a moth problem, and if you don’t act quickly things could get expensive and fast. 

Don’t panic, moths aren’t fun but with the right knowhow you can save your clothing and other valuables from damage and get rid of your moths in no time. Old school methods like mothballs—which are notoriously harmful to our pets and families—simply aren’t the way to go. In fact, you’re usually better off living with moths than filling your home with naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene, the active ingredients in mothballs, which have been linked to countless scary side effects. So skip the poisonous stuff, and let’s solve your moth problem without harmful chemicals.

 

Taking a few simple precautions can help ensure you never deal with moths or their damaging habits again. Here’s what you’ll want to do:

  • Basic housekeeping is essential to moth prevention. Regularly dust, clean, and vacuum flooring, rugs, moldings, furniture, etc to help keep your home free of moth attractants like dirt, dust, and food debris. 
  • Like any other pest, moths sometimes enter our homes simply by flying or crawling inside. Ensure all doorways, windows, and screens are in good working order and firmly sealed. Address cracks, holes and other potential entry points both inside and outside your home by using caulk or another appropriate sealant. 
  • Moths often hitch a ride into our homes by hiding out in used clothing, antique furniture, old rugs and stuffed animals, even your weekly groceries. Carefully inspect these items for eggs, webbing, caterpillars, damage, and other signs of moths before purchasing and bringing them into your house. 
  • Moths are much more likely to enter your closet or storage space if the items inside are dirty. Moths are strongly drawn to sweat, hair, skin oils, and food and drink stains. If you launder or dry clean items before storing or hanging them in your closet, you’ll enjoy far fewer moth problems in the long run. 
  • Additionally, when storing items away for longer periods of time, always use airtight plastic containers. Moth caterpillars can easily chew through other options like cardboard. 
  • Moths love dark, humid environments, so do your best to keep your closet on the cool side and well ventilated. 
  • Cedar and cedarwood oil are known to kill and repel moths, moth caterpillars, and eggs. Switching your clothes hangers to cedar and hanging Cedar Granules in your closet using a sock or stocking can do wonders for preventing costly moth issues. 
 
 

So you have a moth problem on your hand. What now? First thing’s first: let’s protect your clothing and other valuables from damage. 

First, you’ll need to remove any moth caterpillars, adults, and eggs that might currently be on or in your clothing, rugs, or other textiles. Don’t worry, it’s quite straight forward. All you need to do is take all the items suspected of infestation and wash & dry them on warm settings. Dry cleaning will do the trick, too. Freezing these items for 24-48 hours is also effective, although usually less convenient. 

Next, thoroughly vacuum all potentially moth-infested areas like closets and storage spaces. Make sure to target carpets, rugs, drapery, and other fabrics, as well as any walls or baseboards that display signs of moths, such as webbing or caterpillars. After you’re done, make sure to throw the bag outside immediately to prevent possible re-infestation. 

Lastly, wash and scrub all hard surfaces within potentially infested spaces with a family-safe cleaner to remove any hard to see eggs or grime (moths often leave a dusty, musty film throughout storage areas).

 
 

Now that you know how to prevent moth problems and how to save your clothing and other valuables from damage, it’s time to finally kill and repel those pesky moths. 

TO REPEL

As mentioned above, using Cedar Granules by hanging them in a sock or stocking can be very effective at repelling and removing moths from unwanted areas. Just remember to replenish the Cedar Granules about every 6-8 weeks. For best results, spritz walls, baseboards, and clothing racks within storage spaces with our non-toxic repellent Cedarcide Original. Repeat this process every 2-3 weeks, or more often as needed for ongoing moth problems. 

TO KILL

Our pet and family-safe insecticide, Cedarcide Original, is excellent for solving moth problems quickly, killing not just adults but also moth caterpillars and eggs. Simply spray any adults, caterpillars, or eggs you see with Cedarcide Original and that’s all there is to it. Thoroughly spritz the walls, baseboards, ceiling, and flooring of infested spaces like closets to take care of any hidden caterpillars, eggs, and adults, too

 
 
 

5 Insect-Repelling Plants for Your Home & Yard

Cedarcide blog post image, 5 Insect-Repelling Plants for Your Home & Yard

It doesn’t matter if we’re relaxing in the backyard or basking indoors by the window, bugs have a way of finding us and being super, super annoying. Turns out, plants can help with that. Which, personally, we think is mega cool. Here are 5 such plants that can help keep bugs away from you, your family, and pets at home and in your lawn. Now it’s time to get your green thumb on and soak up some sun!

 

Love lavender? Moths, fleas, flies, and mosquitoes don’t. You can plant lavender by your front and back doors or in your garden to repel insects. If you have trouble with bugs indoors, try placing lavender bouquets around your home. The smell will leave you happy and help you stay bug-bite free!

 

Mint is a delightfully aromatic plant that’s famous for repelling mosquitoes and other troublesome pests, both indoors and outdoors. Mint grows quickly, so it’s best to plant it in pots to avoid it reaching into unwanted areas of your garden. Placing mint near entryways and in hanging pots throughout known trouble spots can help substantially with flying insects. For indoor use, use dried mint in open containers wherever you experience the most bug traffic.

 

We love lemongrass! It smells so, so good and it’s incredible at helping kill and repel unwanted bugs. So good in fact, that it fuels one of our most popular products, Tickshield with Lemongrass.

Citronella emits a similarly clean, lemon-like scent and is widely used to control mosquitoes, flies, ants, and other irritating pests. From sprays to candles, citronella is used in a wide array of over-the-counter bug repellents, especially those that target mosquitoes. So why not skip the middleman and plant it yourself instead?

 

 

Basil is another great herb that’s used both in the kitchen and to repel bugs like flies and mosquitoes. Plant your basil in containers and then simply place these near where you relax and unwind both in your backyard and indoors. Bonus: as you grow basil, you can also throw it in your favorite recipes to add a pop of flavor.

 

This stunning plant will brighten up your place and repel bugs all at the same time. Even better, it’s super easy to grow! You can place petunias in planters or hanging baskets both inside and outside for natural pest control. Planting petunias in your garden can do wonders for helping keep fruits & veggies like tomatoes bug-free.

 

 

5 Ways to Keep Pests Away With Cedar Granules

cedarcide blog post image, 5 ways to keep pests away with cedarcide granules

Our popular Cedar Granules are a 100% natural approach to protect your lawn, home, and family from harmful bugs. Here are 5 of our favorites:

 

A layer of Cedar Granules spread along your home’s foundation and fence line creates a powerful defense against fleas, ants, mites, and other biting insects.

 

Adding a handful of granules to your potted plants every few months is a simple way to keep them free of annoying pests like spider mites.

 

Spreading Cedar Granules throughout your lawn & garden protects it from damaging insects without harsh chemicals.

 
 

Hanging a sock full of Cedar granules in your closet acts like a cedar chest. Bye-bye moths!

 

Placing a few handfuls of granules inside your dog’s bed lining will help deter fleas, mites, mosquitoes, and more.

 

cedarcide blog post image, how to protect clothing from insect damage

How to Protect Clothing from Insect Damage

 

Carpet Beetles

Emerging from eggs laid on clothing, furniture, and carpet, carpet beetle larvae can ruin a closetful of clothes in no time, especially natural items like wool, fur, mohair and more. 

What to look for: Small beetles for adults (most commonly black or brown, sometimes multicolored), and small caterpillar-like larvae (usually brownish red, covered in fine hairs).

Moths


Infamous for leaving holes in clothing, moth larvae feed on wool, flannel, fur, and almost any other textile that’s dirty or recently used (sweat, food, skin oils, etc are all appetizing to these destructive pests).

What to look for: Whitish worm-like larvae with a hard outer shell, and very small white or gold-colored moths for adults.

Silverfish and Firebrats

These close relatives are both expert clothing destroyers, preferring starched items, natural fibers like rayon, silk, and cotton, and those stained with sugary food and drink. 

What to look for: Silver wingless insects with carrot-shaped bodies about ¼ inch long.

Roaches


While they don’t usually eat clothing on purpose, roaches are attracted to the sweat, and food spills that end up on our clothing. When consuming these items, they often create holes and stain fabrics with excrement.


Crickets


Like roaches, crickets eat clothing stains not clothing itself. Small holes and tears, not to mention cricket poop, can easily lead to hundreds of dollars in damage in only a few weeks.

 

 

That means freshly cleaned, starch-free, and in a cool, dry place in tightly sealed containers or nylon bags (leather and fur items require breathable bags, such as cotton).

 

Regularly cleaning and vacuuming rugs, carpets, draperies, baseboards, furniture, and storage closets substantially lowers your risk of clothes-eating pests by removing eggs, larvae, and the debris they need to survive. Dispose of the bag when finished.

 

Hang freshly dried lavender or Cedar Granules inside of a stocking in your chosen storage area to protect against damaging bugs. A cedar-based spray like Cedarcide Original can also be used throughout the space to kill and repel.

 

For already infested items: try washing & drying them, freezing them for 48 hours, or treating them with a fabric-safe insecticide like Cedarcide Original.

 

 

 


FREE SHIPPING + HAPPINESS GUARANTEE
Left Menu Icon
Cart Menu Button Image0
Your Cart