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Posts Tagged ‘cedarcide’

A Misunderstood Breed Gets A Helping Hand: TLP Celebrates Pit Bull Awareness Month (All Year Long)

 

In honor of Pit Bull Awareness Month and Pit Bull Awareness Day (Oct 28), we caught up with Aften Bell, Founder of The Love Pit, a non-profit pit bull rescue located in Dallas, Texas. Built upon the mission of “reducing the homeless pit bull population through rescue, rehabilitation, training and advocacy,” the Love Pit is helping raise the bar for rescues the nation over. Covering everything from pit bulls’ unique personalities to the Love Pit’s inspirational beginnings, read our interview with Aften Bell below.

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Can you give us a little background on the Love Pit: How long it’s been around, what inspired you to start it, how it all came together?

It really all started in 2015. I was coming home from work and I saw a dog walking into oncoming traffic. I got out and called to her, “Come here Sweet Pea.” For whatever reason, that name just came out. She slowly walked over to me, and as she got closer I saw the damage to her face. Basically, a big part of her face was missing—it had been chewed off by another dog. Seeing something like that can really change your perspective.

Once we got to the vet, I took some photos. I posted a single photo on Instagram, and within 48 hours, we had raised close to $5,000. It really inspired me to take a bigger step, not only to help dogs, but also to work with people who shared my vision. It took $1,500 of surgeries to get her fixed up. Then we took the rest of the money and rescued 13 more dogs from euthanasia in Ft. Worth. I ended up adopting Sweet Pea, and she’s still with us today.

 

Rescue is obviously a worthy cause, by why pit bulls in particular? Is it because Sweet Pea is a pit bull?

I was actually already fostering 4 pit bulls prior to finding her. Originally, I started with a general breed rescue. But after fostering more pits, I fell in love with their personalities and the breed in general. Also, after getting involved with other pit bull rescues, I got more educated about what was going on with pit bulls at shelters.
“Of the 1.4 million dogs euthanized at shelters every year, 40% are pitbulls. That’s nearly 500,000.”

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” What a difference rescue, compassion and love make!”  -Photo courtesy of The Love Pit Facebook Page.

What do you think makes the breed so special—What do you love about pit bulls so much?

It’s simple: It’s how much they love. They give so much of themselves to please their human, more than most breeds I’ve worked with. Their loyalty and affection is my #1 favorite thing. They’re also some of the easiest dogs to train. Last but not least, it’s their goofy personalities—those floppy ears and big smiles!

Has running the Love Pit changed your outlook on dogs, on people? If so, how?

As far as changing my perspective on dogs, mostly it’s just made me love and understand them more. As far as people go, I never realized how much rescue can affect people’s lives. I’ve had volunteers who suffer from depression and social anxiety—where they can’t be around crowds—but now, because they have a purpose and moral mission with these dogs, they’re able to go out to adoption events and connect with other volunteers. Rescue opens up this whole new world to people.

What do you say to those still apprehensive about pit bulls? How do you approach the misconceptions surrounding the breed?

I could tell you facts about pit bulls all day, but it’s not going to matter until you have an interaction with a pit bull firsthand. Until someone has that positive experience, it’s hard to change their mind.

I used to be afraid of pit bulls myself in high school. Then I met my first pit bull. He was a friend of mine’s dog, about 100 lbs, very intimidating looking. But he was a complete goofball! There was no aggression in him whatsoever. After that, everything I thought I knew about pit bulls went out the door. I wouldn’t have changed my mind had I not experienced that for myself. I encourage people to come out to our events. You don’t even have to volunteer. Just come out, see what we’re about, visit one our pit bull kissing booths, get a “I kissed a pit and I liked it” sticker, and come pet a dog. And then if you want to volunteer, by all means volunteer.

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Rachel, long time TLP volunteer and adopter of #TLPalumni Cleo says her favorite part about the breed is: “They are always there for you and give you tons of hugs!!! And accept your hugs all the time!”

What is the rehabilitation process like for the pits you rescue?

We look at the rescue model differently. We don’t rescue based on how many dogs we can save, it’s more about quality over quantity. We invest 100% in every dog we rescue, from rehabilitation all the way to post-adoption. All of our foster parents are required to come to weekly training classes. Every dog has their own training plan, because every dog is different. Out of the 300 pit bulls we’ve fostered and rescued, we’ve never had to euthanize one for behavioural issues.

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Maegan Carlile,  fitness coach, volunteer for TLP and long time Pit Bull advocate,  is pictured here with one of her recent fosters, Ella.

What are some ways that people can support or otherwise get involved with the Love Pit?

We are a 100% volunteer-based rescue, so donations are big for us. We’re very focused on transparency. We want you to know where your money goes. We also do not use boarding or kennel facilities, which means the number of dogs we can save depends on how many foster homes we have. Foster parents are basically the heartbeat of our rescue. When you foster parent with us, you’re not alone. You have your your own trainer, your own medical coordinator. We cover all bedding costs. We also offer to pay for all dog food.

Is the Love Pit doing anything special for Pit Bull Awareness Month?

Yes we are! We have quite a few things going on this month. We just started a new education program called Keep Calm, Bully On. A big part of our mission is not only rescue, training and rehabilitating, but also advocating and educating. After two years, we’re now finally able to start the educational portion of our mission. We’re launching this for Pit Bull Awareness Month.

We’re going to be down in Houston at Spinal Tap Brewery on Pit Bull Awareness Day as well for a Pit Bull Awareness festival, which we’re hosting in partnership with Brave Bully Rescue and Good Lif3 Bully Rescue.

 

SEARCH ADOPTABLE DOGS

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*If you’re interested in donating, volunteering, or simply learning more about The Love Pit, visit www.thelovepitrescue.org.

7 Essential Lawn & Garden Tips For Fall


Carved pumpkins, sweater weather, and gorgeous leaves are all things we associate with autumn. But when in comes to fall there’s something else to consider: Your lawn. The steps you take now during the fall months will determine the health of your lawn for seasons to come. By adhering to a handful of simple tips, you can greatly increase the chances you’ll experience a thriving, productive lawn once spring rolls around. Here’s 7 essential lawn and garden tips for fall.

 

Keep Watering and Mowing

It might come as a surprise, but during fall you should continue to water and mow your lawn more or less as usual. In general, it’s a good idea to lower your mower’s cutting setting to approximately 2 inches in height, as shorter grass tends to fare better in autumn (shorter grass means more sunlight exposure, which makes for a healthier lawn).
Aerate the Soil

Oxygen, water, and fertilizer cannot penetrate the soil if it’s too tightly compacted. That’s where aeration comes in—and fall is the perfect time to do it. By puncturing holes in your lawn, and removing plugs of soil here and there, you give your yard the opportunity to absorb any surface nutrients it might have otherwise been missing. Tip: for best results, fertilize just after aerating your lawn.

 

Fertilize

An even blanket of dry fertilizer applied in mid to late fall is a smart way to ensure a healthier, more productive lawn through the rest of the year. We recommend going organic with your fertilizer if at all possible.

 

Rake Up Those Leaves

As fallen leaves pile up on your lawn, they begin to choke the life out of your greenery. Robbed of oxygen and sunlight, the soil becomes less and less fertile. To give your lawn the best chance of flourishing in spring, keep it free of leaves through the fall and winter months.

 

Use Plant-Based Pest Control

 

Making your yard inhospitable to pests will save your lawn considerable damage during the fall months. We recommend treating your yard with a non-toxic outdoor pesticide. Here’s how to do it:

  • Thoroughly spray the entire yard. Be sure to spray all hedges, shrubbery, flower gardens, bases of trees, and anywhere else bugs might hide.
  • When spraying, pay special attention to the perimeter of your yard and home, including all fencing, foundations and brick barriers. This will prevent bugs from entering your yard or home after treatment.
  • During the fall months, we advise spraying your yard at least once every 4-6 weeks, or more as needed

Cedarwood chips can also be used to create a repellent perimeter around your lawn and home. Simply sprinkle the chips along your home’s foundation and fence line, as well as any other insect trouble areas.

 

Kill the Weeds

Weeds are most vulnerable to herbicides in fall. If you’re hoping to finally conquer those pesky weeds, now’s the time. Be cautious when choosing an herbicide, however, as most are extremely toxic and unsafe for pets, people and the environment. Tip: Go with a non-toxic alternative instead.

 

Fill in the Bald Spots

Thick, healthier lawns are less susceptible to harmful pests and weeds—and filling in your yard’s bald spots is one of the easiest ways to achieve a healthier lawn. In fall, the ground is still warm, there’s plenty of moisture and there’s less direct sunlight drying out the soil, so seeds are more likely to take hold now than summer or spring. We recommend consulting a lawn and garden store regarding your specific grass and soil types, but in general an all-in-one organic repair mixture is the most convenient option for naturally filling in bald spots.

How to Recycle Cedarcide Bottles

Cedarcide blog post image, How to Recycle Cedarcide Bottles

Recycling is important to us here at Cedarcide. Animals, the environment, and future generations depend on the conservation efforts we as a planet make today—and that means the world to us! Because so many of you share our values, we wanted to create a short guide on how to recycle the different kinds of bottles we use for our naturally sourced formulas. Below is a list of our different bottles, followed by a short set of instructions on how to correctly recycle each one. We’ve also included the type of plastic each container is made from by listing its Resin Identification Code.

Thank you for taking the health of our planet seriously!

You can find your local recycling center by clicking here. Additional recycling instructions for plastic bottles can be found here. For tips on recycling everything else, click here.

 

1 oz. Clear Plastic Spritzer (Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate)

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(Cedarcide OriginalTickshield)

(1): Remove and separate the spray top and lid. Note: The lid is recyclable, the spray top contains metal and therefore can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #1 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

1 oz. and 2 oz. Glass Bottles


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(Cedarwood Essential Oils)

(1): Remove and separate the lid. Note: The lid is can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): Glass bottles can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

4 oz. White Plastic Bottle (Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate)


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(Vet’s ChoicePCO ChoiceCedarsuds)

(1): Remove the lid. Note: The lid is also recyclable (Plastic #1)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #1 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

Pint Size Clear Plastic Bottle (Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate)


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(1): Remove the lid. Note: The lid is also recyclable (Plastic #1)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #1 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

Pint Size White Plastic Bottle (Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene)


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(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield, Cedarsuds)

(1): Remove and separate the spray top and lid. Note: The lid is made of a different recyclable plastic (Plastic #5, Polypropylene), the spray top contains metal and therefore can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #2 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure. #5 plastics are less common, consult your local center for best recycling practices

 

Quart Size White Plastic Bottle (Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene)


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(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield, Vet’s Choice, Cedarsuds, PHLScorpion ShieldScorpion Defense, PCO Choice, Yardsafe)

(1): Remove and separate the spray top and lid. Note: The lid is made of a different recyclable plastic (Plastic #5, Polypropylene); the spray top contains metal and therefore can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (Not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #2 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

Gallon Size Plastic Bottle (Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene)


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(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield, Vet’s Choice, DASCedarshield, Scorpion Shield, Scorpion Defense, PCO Choice, Ridaweed)

(1): Remove the lid and foil seal. Note: The lid can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics—check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #2 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

Gallon Size Clear Plastic Bottle (Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate)


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(Petsafe GranulesHomesafe GranulesCampsafe Granules)

(1): Remove and separate the lid. Note: The lid can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics—check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #1 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

5 Gallon White Plastic Pail (Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene)


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(Cedarcide Original, PCO Choice, Cedarshield)

(1): Carefully remove and separate the lid and metal wire handle. Note: The lid is recycable; check your local recycling center to see if they will accept the metal handle

(2): Thoroughly rinse the pail with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #2 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

2.5 oz., 4 oz. and 8 oz. Aluminum Bottles


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(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield)

(1): Remove and separate the spray top and lid. Note: The lid is recyclable, the spray top contains metal and therefore can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): Check with your local recycling center to find out how your community recycles non-ferrous metals like aluminum

 

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page and let us know what you think!

 

10 All Natural Ways to Get Rid of Japanese Beetles

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By Futureman1199 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27435825

 

The story goes like this: in the early 1900s Japanese beetles were accidentally introduced into the American ecosystem via shipments from Japan. Mostly isolated to the Eastern and Midwest regions of the U.S., these green and copper-colored beetles have very few natural predators in our country, which has led them to become one of the most widely spread and damaging garden pests. Most active during the warmest summer months (mid June to late August for adults, fall and late spring for larvae), these beetles and their larval grub form can wreak havoc on your lawn. The adult beetles “skeletonize” nearly all forms of plant life, while their younger grub counterparts consume grass and other roots from below the soil. Because Japanese beetles eat in groups and feed from both above and below the soil, they can devastate entire lawns & gardens in no time. If Japanese beetles are destroying your lawn, or you’re just looking for ways to keep that from happening in the first place, here’s 10 All Natural Ways to Get Rid of Japanese Beetles.


Get Your Hands Dirty

The tried and true method of hand picking Japanese beetles from your lawn & garden is still the most effective approach to controlling these pests. It can take some time, but the effect it can have on the health of your plants is well worth the effort. For best results, do this in early morning, when Japanese beetles are most active. Using gloves, pluck the beetles from grass and other plant life being careful not to squeeze or crush them (doing so could attract more beetles). Dispose of them by dropping them in a bucket of soapy water (2 tablespoons of liquid dish soap per 1 gallon of water)—this is one of the most humane ways to eliminate Japanese beetles.

 

Feed the Birds

Keeping guinea fowl around your lawn & garden is a proven way to limit not only Japanese beetle populations, but that of ticks and other pests as well. However, not everyone wants to keep these loud birds as pets. In that case, finding ways to attract ducks and other birds to your yard will do the trick. Spraying your entire lawn with a soapy mixture of 2 tablespoons dish soap to 1 gallon of water will help force Japanese beetle larvae to the surface, which in turn will attract hungry birds (this should be done in fall and late spring, when Japanese beetles are in the larval stage of their life cycle). Continue this process weekly until no further larvae emerge from the soil.

 

Take Care of Your Plants

Japanese beetles are most attracted to rotting and overripe plants, so keeping a healthy lawn & garden is key. Promptly remove diseased or otherwise dying plants, trees, fruits and vegetables before they attract additional beetles to your yard. Harvesting plants before they become appetizing to beetles is important also.


Use Row Covers

Row covers allow air, sun, water and other essential elements to reach your plants while keeping Japanese beetles out. Remember: To remain effective, the edges of the cover must be flush with the ground, or otherwise firmly sealed. If Japanese beetle grubs have already infested your soil, this method is not for you, as it will only serve trap the beetles inside the cover with your plants.

 

Beneficial Nematodes

One of the greener options for Japanese beetle control involves introducing parasitic roundworms into the soil. Also known as beneficial nematodes, these organisms can devastate soil-dwelling pests like Japanese beetle larvae. Once they’ve located and entered a host, these nearly microscopic worms release a bacteria that’s deadly to the young beetles. After killing their host they move on to another beetle, reproducing in the process. For best results, introduce nematodes into your soil in late August or early September to attack the next cycle of beetles for the following year (while this is the optimal approach, nematodes can be added to the soil at any time, so long as the soil is sufficiently watered). Note: the nematode species Heterorhabditis is said to be most effective against Japanese beetles; the nematode pest control method targets larvae, not adult beetles. Beneficial nematodes can typically be found at your local home & garden store.

 

Choose Your Plants Wisely

While Japanese beetles enjoy eating a wide array of plant life, certain types are particularly attractive to these devastating pests. Inundating your garden with Japanese Beetles’ favorite food sources is just asking for trouble. Limit installing such plants as much as is reasonably possible. For a list of Japanese beetles favorite meals, click here.

 

All Natural Pesticides

Apart from hand-picking, natural non-toxic pesticides are the easiest, most effective method for combating these pests. For best results, treat your entire lawn & garden with an eco-friendly and water-soluble outdoor pesticide and repellent; treat monthly or as needed.

 

Drop Cloth

Drop cloths can be highly effective at cutting down Japanese beetle populations. At night, cover your plants with a sufficiently large drop cloth. In the morning when beetles are most active, remove the cloth and dispose of the attached beetles using the aforementioned bucket of soapy water.


Fruit Cocktail Trap

Most Japanese beetle traps are ineffective, usually only serving to attract additional beetles to your lawn & garden. However, a can of fruit cocktail can quickly remove active beetles from your yard. First, ferment the cocktail by leaving it in the sun for a few days—this will make it more attractive to beetles. Next, place the can on top of a brick or bricks stacked inside a pail filled with water (it’s advisable to keep this trap far removed from the plants you’re trying to protect). The cocktail will attract the beetles, the water will drown them. It’s that simple.


Soap + Water Spray

Mix 4 tablespoons of dish soap with water inside a spray bottle. This simple solution makes for a great, all natural Japanese Beetle pesticide. Spray on any beetles you see on or around your lawn & garden.

How to Apply PCO Choice and Yardsafe When Rain is an Issue

Cedarcide blog post image, How to Apply PCO Choice and Yardsafe When Rain is an Issue

At Cedarcide, our naturally sourced outdoor formulas are among our most popular products. Our outdoor pesticide concentrate, PCO Choice, and its ready-to-use counterpart, Yardsafe, both help keep your yard free of troublesome pests without endangering your family, your pets or the environment.

While application of these products is rather straightforward (they’re best applied early morning or late evening, and can be used throughout your entire yard to kill and repel insects) there’s one issue that can complicate the process: Rain. We’re often asked questions like these:
 

  • “It rained after I used PCO Choice, do I have to apply it again?”
  • “It rained yesterday, can I apply Yardsafe today, or should I wait till the soil is dry?”

 
To simplify things, Here’s an outline of when and how to use PCO Choice and Yardsafe when rain is an issue:

 

Applying Before Rain

If the forecast is predicting heavy rainfall in the next 24 to 48 hours, it’s best to wait to apply PCO Choice or Yardsafe until after the rain has passed and the soil has adequately dried (moist soil is fine, but soil saturated with water is too wet for application). Similarly, if heavy rain occurs less than 24 to 48 hours after you’ve treated your yard, we recommend an additional application. Note: light to medium rains do not necessitate additional applications.  

 

Applying After Rain

Let’s say it just rained, maybe a few hours ago or the day before. If the soil is dry or only slightly wet, you’re fine to apply PCO Choice or Yardsafe to your lawn. However, if the soil is muddy, saturated with water or otherwise extremely wet, it’s best to wait until the soil has had more time to dry.

 

Additional Guidelines For Applying PCO Choice

Using a Hose End Sprayer, it takes just 4 oz. of PCO Choice to treat up to 5000 sq. ft. of outdoor space. Avoid applications during peak sun hours—early morning or late evening is best. Apply monthly or as needed.


Dilution Instructions

  • Dilute PCO with warm/hot water; shake to mix until milky white
  • For Hose End SprayersAdd 4 oz. of PCO per 20 gallons of sprayed water (treats up to 5,000 sq. ft. of outdoor space).
  • For Tank Sprayers: Add 2 oz. per 1 gallon of water
  • PCO can be diluted down to 1:1000 for larger, agricultural use

 

Additional Guidelines For Applying Yardsafe

Simply hook up the Hose End Sprayer directly to the bottle, then attach it to the hose and begin spraying. Avoid applications during peak sun hours—early morning or late evening is best. Apply monthly or as needed.

 

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page and let us know what you think!

Vet’s Choice Vs. DAS Whats the Difference?

Vet's Choice Vs. DAS Whats The Difference-.jpg

At Cedarcide, we offer several pest-control solutions for both indoor and outdoor use. From concentrates to ready-to-use formulas, from personal & pet use to lawn & garden care, we have what you need to keep your home, yard and animals free of pests.

But which products are right for you? To make your shopping experience easier, we’re launching a series of blog posts to help you better understand the differences between our most popular formulas. Today we’re talking about our two all natural pet & livestock solutions: Vet’s Choice and D.A.S.

 

What is Vet’s Choice?
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Vet’s Choice is an extra strength, all natural and highly versatile concentrate designed to control insects and parasites commonly found on pets and livestock. Vet’s Choice eliminates and repels fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, flies, mites, gnats, ear mites and dozens of other biting insects. Vet’s Choice can be mixed with water for use as a bath, spray or dip. Vet’s Choice can be used in stables, barns and kennels to reduce flying insects, or used as a treatment for mange, hot spots and other animal skin disorders.

Dilution Instructions

  • Dilute Vet’s Choice with warm/hot water; shake to mix until milky white
  • For Direct Spray: Add 4 oz. of Vet’s Choice per 1 gallon of water
  • For A Bath: Add 2 oz. per 1 gallon of water
  • For A Dip 1:200 ratio of Vet’s Choice to water

 

What is D.A.S?

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DAS (Domestic Animal Spray) is an all natural and highly versatile solution designed to control insects and parasites commonly found on pets and livestock—think of it as a ready-to-use version of Vet’s Choice. Like Vet’s Choice, DAS is ideal for use in stables, barns and kennels to reduce flying insect populations, and can be used as a bath, spray or dip. DAS eliminates and repels fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, flies, mites, gnats, ear mites and dozens of other biting insects; it can also be used to treat mange, hot spots and other animal skin disorders.

To useDAS works best when animals are thoroughly wetted with the product and then allowed to air dry. Apply directly to your animal’s skin or simply add it to their bath for lasting protection against pests. For additional protection and prevention, dilute DAS with water at a 3:1 ratio and apply to your pets’ bedding using a spray bottle.

 

How Are They Different?

DAS is simply a ready-to-use, pre-diluted version of Vet’s Choice. Vet’s Choice contains 90% cedar oil; DAS contains 3% cedar oil.

Who Should Buy Vet’s Choice?
Those treating many animals—such as in agricultural use or for facilities like animal rescues—should choose Vet’s Choice because it’s concentrated, meaning it will last longer than the same amount of DAS. Vet’s Choice is also more customizable, allowing customers to dilute the solution to whatever concentration they prefer.

Who Should Buy DAS?
Those looking for a quick and convenient solution to protect pets or livestock from biting insects. While Vet’s Choice will last longer because it’s concentrated, DAS is easier to use, with less need to dilute.

10 All Natural Tips to Get Rid of Carpenter Ants

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Carpenter ants are among the the largest ants in the United States, measuring up to 20 mm—or roughly ¾ of an inch. Most often black but sometimes red or yellow, carpenter ants live both indoors and outdoors, nesting inside moist, decaying wood (like old tree trunks, or rotting wooden boards in human structures). While they burrow and colonize inside wooden materials like termites, unlike termites, they do not consume wood. Instead, their diet is like that of other ants, consisting mostly of sweet foods and meats.

Because they do not eat wood, carpenter ants are not nearly as damaging to homes as termites. However, if given enough time, a highly developed and mature colony can cause extensive damage to nearly any wooden structure. With queens living up to 25 years, it’s not hard to imagine how costly a carpenter ant colony couble be to a homeowner. If you’re seeing these little carpenters crawling throughout your home, or looking to prevent an infestation before it takes hold, here’s 10 Tips to Get Rid of Carpenter Ants Naturally.

 

Prevention

Prevention is always the best form of pest control. Follow these simple guidelines to keep carpenter ants out of your home.

  • Keep your home clean—particularly the kitchen, flooring, windowsills and countertops. Without a food source, ants will have no reason to enter your home.
  • Seal all food in tightly closed containers. Keep all food storage areas free of crumbs and residues (Tip: wipe off all those jam, sauce and honey containers).
  • Never leave food remains or dirty dishes in the sink.
  • Take the trash out regularly, and keep all trash cans clean and sealed.
  • Any spilled food should be cleaned up immediately.
  • Seal any cracks, crevices and holes—all potential ant entrances—with caulk or other sealant.
  • Remove or remedy all sources of unnecessary moisture both inside and outside your home, including: leaky plumbing, basements, crawl spaces, A/C units, hoses, faucets, sprinklers, clogged drainage areas, etc
  • Remove possible nesting spaces from your yard, such as: woodpiles, wooden yard equipment, brush, dead or dying trees & tree strumps, unused dog houses, furniture, and any other possibly  moist, wooden items.
  • Keep tree limbs and branches away from the walls of your home. Carpenter ants use these as bridges to enter your home.
  • Do not store lumber or firewood inside or right outside your home.

natural spring cleaning tips

 

Find The Nest

The most effective methods for ridding yourself of carpenter ants all involve locating and treating their nests directly. Carpenter ants nest in moist, decaying wood. These nests can be located either inside or outside the home, and unless you actually follow the trailing ants back to their origin, it’s not always easy to determine which. However, in general, if you find carpenter ants inside your home during late winter or early spring, chances are the colony is located indoors. Here’s some tips for locating a carpenter ant colony:

  • Look for frass. Frass is finely ground wood debris that resembles sawdust. It’s the result of carpenter ants boring into wood to build their nests. If you see this in your home, the carpenter ants are somewhere inside.
  • Damaged wood on or within walls, doors, cabinets, and wood beams is a good indicator of an indoor colony. Look specifically for sandpaper-smooth carpenter ant galleries and holes.
  • Place attractants like dog food, jam or other sweets where you most commonly spot carpenter ants. Using their trail, attempt to find the location of their nest.
  • If you have woodpiles or other wooden debris inside or just outside your home, check them thoroughly—the ant colony could be inside.

how to get rid of ants

Boiling Water

If you were able to find the carpenter ant nest (and it was located outdoors), this natural method is a way to attack the ant colony directly. It’s simple: boil a few liters or more of water and then pour it directly into the nest (this can be dangerous, so please exercise extreme caution). Adding a natural and water-soluble insecticideessential oils, or soap to the boiled water will make this approach even more effective. You may have to repeat this process two to three times to completely eliminate the colony.

 

Sugar and Baking Soda Bait

A simple and natural carpenter ant bait can be made by mixing equal parts baking soda and powdered sugar. Strategically place this mixture in shallow dishes in the locations with the most ant traffic. These can also be placed outside, particularly near doors and windows. The sugar in the mixture attracts the ants, while the baking soda naturally kills them (for chemical reasons, baking soda is deadly to ants).

 

Essential Oils

Like most ants, carpenter ants use pheromone trails for navigation and communication—it’s also how they find food. Essential oils can be used to disrupt these trails, which ultimately disorients and deters ants. Lemongrass, peppermint, clove, cedarwood, tea tree, orange and lemon oil are all effective.

Dampen a cotton ball or kitchen towel with an essential oil of your choosing. Use this to wipe windowsills, baseboards, the perimeters of countertops, door frames, and any potential entry points. Repeat daily until ant population disappears. Your chosen oil can also be diluted with a carrier oil to create a natural ant-killing spray.

 

Soap & Water

A simple mixture of soap and water is toxic to carpenter ants. Mix one part natural dish soap to two parts water in a spray bottle. Spray as needed to kill ants and eliminate their pheromone trails. Continue to treat problem areas until the ants no longer return.

 

Diatomaceous Earth

Made from crushed algae fossils, Diatomaceous Earth is a well known natural pesticide. This abrasive material damages the exoskeleton of ants that come into contact with it, eventually killing them. Spread DE throughout ant problem areas and directly on the colony’s nest if possible. Diatomaceous Earth is especially effective for combatting carpenter ants, which regularly die from consuming it.

Non-toxic Insecticides—Both Indoor and Outdoor

All natural, over-the-counter insecticides are often the easiest and most effective option for completely eliminating a carpenter ant colony. The best approach is to treat both outside and inside your home. Non-toxic indoor insecticidescan be used as both a repellent and a contact killer. Natural outdoor insecticides also work as both deterrents and spot killers. For best results, apply non-toxic outdoor pesticides alongside fence lines and your home’s foundation; this will create a repellent barrier to keep ants from entering your home. Treating your entire yard will help to eliminate any active outdoor carpenter ant colonies.

why you should stop using synthetic pesticides

 

Vinegar

Vinegar is an extremely effective natural carpenter ant deterrent. It disrupts their pheromone trails and the smell prevents them from returning. Mix a 1-to-1 ratio of water to vinegar in a spray bottle (both apple cider and white vinegar will do). Shake the solution and then spray along baseboards, door frames, window sills, countertops, and directly on the nest if possible. Repeat the process daily or as needed to repel carpenter ants. Vinegar is a natural disinfectant and multi-surface cleaner—so feel free to use the spray liberally.

 

Cinnamon & Cinnamon Oil

Not unlike the previously mentioned essential oils and vinegar, cinnamon and cinnamon oil deter ants by interfering with their pheromone trails. Dispense the cinnamon in whatever form throughout ant problem areas and directly on the nest if possible. When used around windowsills, baseboards, near doors and alongside countertops, cinnamon helps prevent carpenter ants from entering your home.

how to get rid of termites

Is Cedar Oil Safe For Birds?


We love animals here at Cedarcide. And not just common pets like dogs, cats and horses—we love them all. In fact, protecting animals and the environment from the toxic effects of traditional pesticides is a big part of what inspires us to do what we do.

Because many of our customers are bird owners, or use our products for agricultural reasons, we’re sometimes asked, “Is cedar oil toxic to birds?” The answer is yes—but it’s a little complicated. While we have customers who use our products to treat outdoor chicken coops and cages, our products are not formulated for birds, and therefore we suggest you do not use them on or for birds. When applied directly or otherwise used incorrectly, cedar oil can be toxic, even deadly to birds.

 

Cedar Oil And Birds

Cedar bedding and cedar oil are known to irritate birds’ delicate respiratory systems, and at high doses, can actually kill them. Birds are especially vulnerable to strong scents—like those found in essential oils, candles, and manufactured fragrances. Phenols, which are present in many of these strong-smelling items, are often the culprit: phenols are toxic to several small animals such as cats and birds. If you fear your bird may have been exposed to toxic fumes, look for the common signs of disease and illness in birdsFor a full a list of woods toxic to birds, click here.

is cedar oil safe for cats

 

How Is Cedarcide Cedar Oil Different?

Firstly, Cedarcide cedar oil never contains phenols or phenolic compoundsSecondly, because we use only the highest quality cedar oil sourced from only pet-safe cedar trees (Juniperus ashei, to be specific), our products are always all natural and non-toxic. Using a multi-step filtration process, our cedar oil is purified of all unnecessary contaminants and other potentially harmful ingredients. However, as mentioned before, cedar-based products should never be used directly on birds under any circumstance.

is cedar oil safe for horses

 

Pest Control For Birds

Even though Cedarcide products aren’t suitable for birds, there are several other natural options for protecting your pet birds or chickens from biting insects and parasites. From diatomaceous earth and bug-repelling plants, to apple cider vinegar and natural cleaning practices, there are many non-toxic and eco-friendly ways to reduce the insect populations that threaten your avian friends. For more info on natural pest control for birds, check out the following resources:

 

why you should stop using synthetic pesticides

10 Natural Ways to Get Rid of Weeds

Cedarcide blog post image, 10 Natural Ways to Get Rid of Weeds
When it comes to weed control, the world’s on edge. Monsanto—producer of the most financially successful weed-killer on the planet, Roundup—is currently locked in a mess of legal battles. Rumor and science have it that Roundup’s active ingredient, Glyphosate, causes cancer. As the most widely used herbicide on the planet—on average, a pound of Roundup is used on every acre of cropland in the U.S., half a pound on every acre of cropland worldwide—these findings should alarm all of us.

This is yet another reminder why it’s important to seek out non-toxic alternatives to chemical-based herbicides and pesticides. The truth is when it comes to weeds, you can go natural and still get the results you’re looking for. Whereas traditional weed-killers endanger our soil, our water, family and pets, the following chemical-free alternatives threaten only one organism: Weeds!

 

Baking Soda

Sodium makes soil less hospitable to dandelions and other common weeds. To prevent weeds and other unwanted grasses from growing, use baking soda. Apply the baking soda at roughly 1 teaspoon per individual weed plant, being sure to cover the entire plant—including stem, leaves and flowers. Baking soda can also be applied by sweeping it into sidewalk cracks and other common problem areas. Tip: be careful and precise when using baking soda to eliminate weeds, as the sodium can also kill surrounding plant life.

 

Salt

Salt works the same way baking soda does: sodium helps kill and prevent weed growth. Mix a solution of 1 cup salt to 2 cups water, and apply it to any undesirable plant growth using a spray bottle. This solution can also be boiled and then applied for added weed-killing power. Caution: never use more salt than necessary, as considerable salting of soil can render it unhealthy.

 

Vodka

Have some extra vodka lying around? If so, you also have a free DIY weed-eliminator. Mix 1 oz. of vodka with 2 cups of water and a few drops of liquid dish soap in a spray bottle. Apply the mixture in the heat of the day, thoroughly coating the weeds’ leaves. This solution works by breaking down the weeds’ natural waxy coat, making them vulnerable to sun damage and dehydration. Note: this method does not work for weeds growing in shade.

 

Pull Them

The obvious tried-and-true method of pulling weeds by hand is still one of the best. This approach is easiest when the soil is soft and wet, like just after a light rainfall. For detailed instructions on how to properly pull weeds, click here.

 

Vinegar

Vinegar is a fast and highly effective natural weed-killer. While both white vinegar and apple cider vinegar will work, agricultural-strength vinegar is the most convenient and effective option. Using a spray bottle, thoroughly soak both the foliage and lower stem of each weed plant. Apply with caution, as vinegar kills most types of plant life, not just weeds. If it rains shortly after application, you may need to reapply once the soil has dried out again.

 

Corn Gluten Meal

While corn gluten meal—a finely ground byproduct of the corn milling process—won’t kill existing weeds, it’s a miracle solution for preventing weed growth. In effect, corn gluten meal works by preventing weed seeds from germinating, and ultimately sprouting. Best of all, corn gluten meal doubles as a nutrient-rich plant food.

 

Boiling Water

When boiled, basic household tap water transforms into a weed-destroying formula. Simply pour the boiling water anywhere you’re experiencing weed troubles (careful—boiling water can also kill surrounding plant life if not applied directly to the weeds alone). Please exercise extreme caution when using this approach.

 

Mulch

As with other plants, weeds cannot grow without sunlight. Kill weeds by denying them of this essential element. Using biodegradable newspapers (most are), completely cover the weeds and then thoroughly coat the newspaper-covered weeds with a two-inch-thick bed of mulch. Note: any grass or plants similarly covered will likely die as well, so apply carefully.

 

Oil

Toxic, unnatural oils like motor oil are a big no-no, but new or used vegetable oil is both eco-safe and effective at killing weeds. Entirely coat unwanted weeds by carefully pouring vegetable oil on both foliage and stem. The weeds will be gone in no time.

 

Weed-Suppressing Plants

Like all living organisms, weeds have to compete for limited resources to survive (sunlight, soil, water, etc). Researchers at Cornell University found that certain ground-covering plants are especially good at robbing weeds of these necessary resources. Install the following plants to help keep weeds out of your garden:

  • Emerald blue moss phlox
  • Thriller lady’s mantle
  • Walker’s low catmint
  • Golden fleece dwarf goldenrod
  • Albiflorus creeping thyme
  • Herman’s pride false lamium
  • Majestic Lilyturf

 
 

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page to let us know what you think!

Is Cedar Oil Toxic to Cats?

Cats are special to us here at Cedarcide. They work alongside us all day, everyday—sleeping in our laps, lounging on our desks, watching over us as we hand-bottle & package your orders. (We’re now going to shamelessly show off our office cats, because who doesn’t keep 500+ pet pictures on their phones for these exact opportunities, right?)

cats.jpg
C1 and C2 doing their weekly peanut inspections.

(Fun fact: We use pet safe, biodegradable peanuts that are made from corn starch.)

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“I think maybe I can fit in here like dis.” -C2

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Conan enjoying a mid day cat nap.

OK, enough pet pictures (for now.)

 

Occasionally we’re asked, “Is cedar oil toxic to cats?” The short answer is No. We wouldn’t let our furry friends hang around—much less use—our products if they were toxic or otherwise unsafe for cats. But there’s more to be said about the relationship between cedar oil and cats. Let us explain.

 

Cedar Oil And Cats

Cats—being highly sensitive to both odors and many essential oils—can suffer adverse side effects from improperly formulated cedar oil. Phenols, which are naturally present in several essential oils, can be outright fatal to cats, especially smaller individuals such as kittens. An inability to metabolize this common ingredient is what renders some types of cedar oil harmful to cats. Furthermore, some species of cedar—like Western red cedar—are naturally toxic to both pets and people, and should never be used in topical pet products.

 

How Is Cedarcide Cedar Oil Different?

Firstly, Cedarcide cedar oil never contains any phenols or phenolic compounds. Secondly, because we use only the highest quality cedar oil sourced from only pet-safe cedar trees (Juniperus ashei, to be specific), our products are always non-toxic, all natural, and safe for pets. Using a multi-step filtration process, our cedar oil is purified of all unnecessary contaminants—including any potentially harmful ingredients like phenols. However, as with any topical pet product, you should test your cat for possible sensitivity or allergy to cedar oil with a small first application.

 

How To Use Cedarcide For Cats

At Cedarcide, we offer three products for cats and cat owners: our all natural insect spray, Cedarcide Original, our non-toxic pet shampoo, Cedarsuds, and the all new Flea + Tick Brush.  

Tips for Using Cedarcide Original On Cats
Because cats like to lick their fur, and because they’re also extremely sensitive to scents, it’s best to test for possible sensitivity with a light initial application. While Cedarcide Original is non-toxic and cat-safe, on rare occasions smaller cats and kittens have found the natural cedar scent of Cedarcide Original too strong for their liking.

If like most cats, your furry friend takes no issue with Cedarcide Original, apply the formula by lightly misting your hands and massaging the spray into your cat’s coat. Be sure to apply Cedarcide Original all over—including armpits, in between toes, and around the ears and tail. Using Cedarcide Original in this way will not only kill any hidden pests, it will also provide protection against additional fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and other biting insects.

Cedarcide Flea + Tick Brush
The Cedarcide Flea + Tick Brush is the safest, easiest and most effective way to protect your cat from fleas, ticks and other biting insects. Designed to dispense Cedarcide Original insect repellent directly to your pet’s skin, the Flea + Tick Brush takes the mess out of keeping your cat safe from harmful pests. The moisturizing quality of Cedarcide Original will also help with tangles and matting.

Cedarsuds
Our pet shampoo is a favorite among cat owners. Simply use it as you would any other pet shampoo—It will leave your cat with a shiny, clean and great smelling coat.