Mites

Mites Part of the subclass Acari

Latin Name: Part of the subclass Acari

CedarCide has teamed up with Megan Wells at Stop Skin Mites to help you solve the most difficult mite problems. If your life is being seriously affected by a mite infestation, please contact Megan.

Solutions

Our most effective option for combatting Mites (includes Cedarcide Original, PCO Choice, and a Tri-Jet Fogger).
Cedarcide Original kills 99% of mites according to independent studies.
If you’re infested with mites, don’t bother spraying. Fogging is the only way to solve your problem.

Description

There are over 48,000 species of mites. They can be found in almost every corner of the world, surviving everywhere from tropical environments to arid ecosystems, even indoors alongside humans. Like ticks, mites are both arthropods and arachnids, but unlike ticks, not all mites are parasites. Some—like house dust mites—are scavengers, feeding off the dead skin and hair of humans. Some mites feed on mold and other plant-life. Some are symbiotic, living on the backs of insects like bees. And, yes, some are parasitic—like bird mites, rat mites and chiggers—which feed on the blood or skin of their hosts.

You might be surprised to learn that the overwhelming majority of American homes have mites. The good news is that most mites are harmless to humans. However, there are in fact a few species that bite or pose other health risks to people. The extremely irritating skin condition scabies, for instance, is caused by an allergic reaction to the itch mite, which burrows into the skin of mammals to live and lay eggs. Mange is often the result of the same itch mite, along with another species, the Demodex mite (or eyelash mite), which infests the eyelashes of millions of people each year. The Demodex mite has also been linked to rosacea.

The most common biting mites found in the home are rat mites and bird mites. These two parasitic species prey mostly on small animals, but occasionally feed on humans too, causing dermatitis and acute itching. Another common household mite, the dust mite, is not parasitic and therefore does not bite; however, it’s a leading cause of allergies and has been found to cause asthma, too.

 

What Are The Signs Of A Mite Infestation?

Because of their near microscopic size, and because mites vary so greatly from species to species, it’s extremely difficult to correctly identify a mite infestation. While some mites leave noticeable markings—spider mites spin webs, clover mites are recognizable by their bright red color—most mites leave little to no evidence of their existence.

In fact, the sole sign of an infestation often comes by way of the symptoms mites can cause in humans, such as skin irritation and general allergic reaction. Unless you’re able to capture a mite sample and have it identified by a professional, there’s little to no way to confirm what sort of mite infestation you may or may not have.

 

What To Do If You Have Mites

While some mites—like the mostly harmless dust mite—are all but impossible to completely eliminate from your home (regular house cleaning and vacuuming help), troublesome biting mites are comparatively easier to treat. Rat mites and bird mites, for example, can often be eradicated simply by removing any small rodents, birds and bird nests from your home.

If you have mites, but are unsure of the source, fogging your entire home is the best option for you. Fogging your home with an all natural, nontoxic pesticide is the best way to treat all areas where mites could be hiding. If you believe mites have infested your bedding or other linens, washing and drying them on a hot cycle with a natural, water-soluble insect repellent should rid your items of any remaining mites.

 

For more information on Mites and tips on how to reduce their numbers, consult our Guide To Mites

 

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