Cedarcide blog post image, What Are No-See-Ums and How to Get Rid of Them
 

Also known as biting midges or sandflies, no-see-ums are a family of small flies that resemble gnats and mostly feed on plant nectar. If their name didn’t give it away, they’re often impossible to see, as they’re usually no more than 1–3 mm in size (about the size of the point of a pencil!). In fact, most people don’t realize they’ve encountered these bugs until they start to itch. You see, just like mosquitoes, female no-see-ums bite and drink blood, which they require to lay eggs. 

But here’s the bad news: no-see-um bites tend to be more painful, more irritating, and more numerous than mosquito bites, which is largely due to the saw-like mouth parts they use to rip into your skin. In other words, you don’t want these bugs anywhere near you, your family, lawn, or pets—and we’re here to help you make that happen. Read on for simple, family-safe strategies for getting rid of these little monsters and preventing their awful bites. 

 

PREVENTION

Like with any pest, prevention is unquestionably the best form of no-see-um control, and the easiest way to avoid painful bites. Because of their similar life cycles and environmental needs, preventing no-see-ums looks a lot like basic mosquito prevention. That is to say, it’s all about reducing unnecessary moisture, breeding sites, and common hiding spots. Here are some basic guidelines to follow. 

  • Maintaining a clean, organized, and trim yard is essential. No-see-ums are attracted to spaces with clutter and dense vegetation, including brush, bushes, and tall grass. Start by removing all non-essential clutter from your yard, especially items that collect moisture like unused equipment, planters, tree stumps, etc. Then, mow and trim shrubbery weekly or more as needed.
  • If your lawn includes water features like bird baths, decorative ponds, or fountains, you’ll need to closely monitor these items during spring and summer, cleaning and repairing as necessary. Even better, seriously consider draining these features during peak no-see-um season (Mar.–Sept.).
  • To prevent breeding, repair or replace leaky or otherwise faulty drains, pipes, hoses, sprinklers, and faucets ASAP
  • Limiting sources of light just outside your home can significantly reduce no-see-um populations. For best results, keep your blinds closed at night and keep your outside lights off during spring and summer. We also suggest trading your traditional light bulbs for those that do not attract bugs, such as yellow compact fluorescent lights (CFL), sodium vapor bulbs, or halogen options. 

PREVENT NO-SEE-UM BITES

Nobody wants a body covered in red, swollen, itchy bumps. Thankfully, preventing no-see-um bites with Cedarcide is simple and takes just a few seconds. 

Before hiking, camping, lawn work, dog walks, and other activities that could expose you to no-see-ums, apply Cedarcide Original to you, your family, and pets. Then simply reapply every 5-7 hours or after getting wet. Not only is Cedarcide Original non-toxic and safe for your family and pets, it can be used all throughout your home to kill and repel pests like fleas, ticks, ants, mosquitoes, and mites. It’s also a very popular alternative to traditional chemical-based flea & tick products. 

 

RID YOUR LAWN OF NO-SEE-UMS

With the family-safe Lawn + Garden Kit, you can get the bite-free yard you and your family deserve. Best of all, it’s super easy to use and kills and repels all sorts of biting and destructive bugs, not just no-see-ums. 

For best results, spray your entire lawn, including shrubbery and bases of trees, with PCO Choice (which is included with the Lawn + Garden Kit). Pay special attention to dense vegetation like bushes, as this is where no-see-ums tend to hide and breed. Then simply spray again in about two weeks and move on to monthly applications after that.

If you’re not currently struggling with no-see-ums and you’re just looking for prevention, you can start with monthly applications right from the beginning. If you live in a warmer region such as the South, applications should be done every month unless the temperature drops below freezing for more than a few weeks. If you live in a cooler climate, start spraying monthly in late February and then taper off in November as winter really starts to set in.

Because PCO Choice is plant-based and family-safe, no downtime is necessary. You, your family, and pets can enjoy your lawn right after application!

For additional protection, we strongly advise spreading Cedar Granules throughout your outdoor space, especially in those areas where you and your family spend the most time, like patios, balconies, BBQs, etc. (Cedar Granules are also included in the Lawn + Garden Kit).

 
 
Cedarcide blog post image, What bit me, how to ID common Bug Bites

Bug bites happen. And usually by the time you start itching, the bug that got you is long gone. Being able to properly identify a bug bite can not only help you more efficiently treat it, but can be critical in the event your bite becomes a serious medical concern, like in the case of venomous spiders and occasionally ticks and mosquitoes. Below you’ll find some of the most common biting bugs in America, along with info to help identify their bites, and what a typical reaction to that bite might look like.

   

Ants are one of the most common biting and stinging insects found in the U.S. While rarely a serious medical concern, their bites and stings can be quite unpleasant, especially if you live in the south where so called “fire ants” are commonplace.

Ant bites usually look like small red bumps surrounded by red skin, with a white pus-filled head in the middle. 

 

Unlike ants—which typically bite out of fear or aggression—fleas bite because they’re hungry. These little vampires live off mammal and bird blood and unfortunately we humans are no exception. 

Flea bites look not dissimilar to ant bites—essentially, they’re just little red bumps. They usually occur in a cluster of three of four bites and are typically found on the ankles, feet, and lower leg. 

 

When ticks bite, they can hang onto their victims for up to 10 days, which usually makes identifying a tick bite quite easy. Preferring warm, moist locations, tick bites are normally found in hidden areas like the armpit, groin, or on your scalp.

If the tick is no longer attached, identification can be difficult, as tick bites look similar to many other bites: red, irritated skin with mild swelling. There are a couple of main differences though, tick bites, unlike ant and other common insect bites and stings, are not typically filled with pus or any other fluid and rarely if ever cause pain or discomfort.

Because of the potentially serious consequences of a tick bite, contact a physician if you experience any of the following: 

  • Unusual rashes at or near the bite site. 
  • Intense pain or irritation
  • Fever
  • Extreme Lethargy
  • Body aches
  • Flu-like symptoms. 
  • Any other signs or symptoms of infection
  • Dizziness or nausea 
 

Few things can ruin outside time like a cloud of bloodthirsty mosquitoes. While intensely itchy in the moment, mosquito bites usually subside quickly, leaving little to no trace in just a few days. Rarely, however, a mosquito bite can cause more serious reactions, like swelling, soreness, blisters, localized pain, hives, even fever.

Mosquito bites tend to produce a puffy, pink bump about the size of a dime initially that hardens and becomes larger over time. Frequent scratching can lead to more severe reactions and in extreme cases infection 

Because of the potentially serious nature of mosquito bites, contact a physician if you experience any of the following: 

  • Large or otherwise unusual swelling and redness
  • Hives
  • Headache
  • Body aches 
  • Flu-like symptoms. 
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Any other signs or symptoms of infection
  • Dizziness or nausea 
 

The bites of horseflies, deer flies, sand flies, and even some house flies can pack a surprisingly painful punch.

Like most of the bites on this list, fly bites generally cause swelling, skin irritation, and redness at the bite site. Bumps, blisters, rashes, and welts are also common. Fly bites usually occur on the feet, ankles, lower leg, and on the neck and face area. 

Because of the potentially serious nature of some fly bites, contact a physician if you experience any of the following: 

  • Large or otherwise unusual swelling and redness
  • Hives
  • Headache
  • Body aches 
  • Flu-like symptoms. 
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Any other signs or symptoms of infection
  • Dizziness or nausea 
 

Unlike ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes, thankfully spiders do not transmit disease. In fact, they often make meals out of the biting and stinging insects outlined above, for the most part leaving humans alone unless they feel threatened. 

Often about as painful as a bee sting, spider bites tend to cause red, irritated skin with swelling, occasionally accompanied by a rash at the bite site. In some cases, you may even be able to pinpoint two small puncture wounds where the spider’s fangs pierced the skin (don’t worry, it sounds worse than it really is). In rare cases, nausea and dizziness may also occur.

If you experience severe or otherwise unexpected symptoms after a spider bite, or suspect the individual might be venomous like a black widow or brown recluse, contact a physician immediately.

 

Mite bites are among the hardest bites to identify. Firstly, nearly all mites are microscopic or near microscopic, making a proper diagnosis often impossible. And secondly, reactions to mite bites vary greatly, and are often confused with other causes of dermatitis. 

Chiggers are arguably the easiest mite bite to identify. Also known as harvest mites and berry bugs, chiggers live in grassy areas during the spring and summer months, waiting for unsuspecting victims to walk by so they can feed. They latch on, feed on your skin cells for several hours, and then fall off to complete their life cycle. Only a few minutes in chigger-infested areas can leave you with dozens of blisters, rashes, and hives that can itch and hurt for literally months, which can be a real downer during beach season, believe us.

Reddish welts that cause extreme skin irritation once the chigger drops off, these bites almost always occur on areas of the body where skin and clothing are in tight proximity, such as near your socks, waistband, armpits, groin, legs, and back. If you experienced bites that sound like this shortly after exploring the outdoors or sitting in grass, chances are they’re chigger bites. 

The bites of other mites, like bird mites and rodent mites, however, aren’t so easy to pinpoint. Reactions can vary from extreme pain and hives to subtler symptoms like mild irritation or a feeling that something’s crawling on your skin. While these types of mites typically prefer non-human hosts, it’s not extremely uncommon for these mites to affect entire households, and sometimes even their pets. 

Bites from bird and rodent mites tend to share one common characteristic: skin irritation. Sometimes it’s mild, sometimes it’s severe. If you’re experiencing unknown bug bites with no obvious source, it could have mites. 

Sadly for some individuals, mites can be a debilitating, long term problem that can be difficult to get under control. If you’re struggling with mites, we can help. Call us at 800-842-1464 and find relief starting today. 

 
 
Cedarcide blog post image, How to Get Rid of Chiggers with Cedarcide: 3 Steps

Relatives of ticks, chiggers pack one of the most irritating bites on the planet. To make matters worse, they’re nearly microscopic and you won’t know they’ve bitten you until hours after it happens. Even just a few moments in chigger-infested grass can leave you host to blisters, rashes, and hives that can last for months. Trust us, having your body covered in dozens of swollen, itchy bites can really put a damper on pool and beach season, not to mention long summer days spent with family and friends.  

Also known as harvest mites and berry bugs, chiggers live in grassy areas during the spring and summer months, just waiting for an unsuspecting victim to walk by so they can hitch a ride and feed. Contrary to hearsay, these arachnids don’t actually burrow into the body. Instead, they inject you with digestive enzymes that allow them to drink up your skin, leaving tell-tale clusters of red bumps commonly found on waistlines, ankles, armpits, and the crotch region. 

In short, you don’t want these bugs anywhere near your home, family, or pets. We’re here to help you make that happen. Here’s how to get rid of chiggers with Cedarcide in 3 simple steps.

 

Preventing chiggers from setting up camp in your lawn comes down to 4 main things: deterring wildlife, wearing chigger repellent when necessary, maintaining your yard, and limiting outdoor moisture. 

DETER WILDLIFE

Common wildlife like birds, reptiles, and rodents can not only introduce chiggers into our lawns but also attract them. Reducing unnecessary clutter like unused or outdated equipment, keeping shrubbery trim, and sealing attractants like trash cans will help limit the number of wild animals you experience in and around your lawn. Installing fencing will also help considerably.

WEAR CHIGGER REPELLENT WHEN NECESSARY 

It’s not uncommon for chiggers to hitch a ride on our own bodies, clothing, and pets. If one of those happens to fall off into your lawn you could have a thriving chigger population in no time. To avoid this, apply Cedarcide Original to you, your family, and pets before entering wooded spaces and areas with tall grass. 

MAINTAIN YOUR YARD

Like most pests, chiggers love areas that offer dense vegetation to hide and breed. In other words, the more overgrown your lawn, the more likely you are to get chiggers. Do yourself a favor, and regularly mow, trim, weed-eat, and clear brush as needed during the warmer months of the year.

LIMIT MOISTURE

Without moist vegetation or consistent water sources, chiggers will not be able to live in your lawn for very long. Anything that adds extra moisture to your yard—such as leaky faucets, hoses, sprinklers, and items that collect rainwater—should be repaired, replaced, or removed.

 

You don’t have to resort to scary chemicals to keep chiggers out of your lawn. Applying our family-safe lawn treatment PCO Choice to your yard and garden monthly will kill and repel chiggers along with many other common, unwanted pests.

Application is easy. To prevent chiggers before they become a serious problem, spray your entire front and back yards with PCO Choice monthly, including shrubbery and small trees. For warmer regions, applications should be done every month unless the temperature drops below freezing for more than several weeks. If you live in a colder climate, we suggest spraying monthly through October and then starting up again in early March.

If you’re currently experiencing those horrible chigger bites and seem to be facing an ongoing population in your yard, start by spraying your entire outdoor space twice, two weeks apart, and then move on to monthly preventative applications afterward. 

Because PCO Choice is plant-based and family-safe, no downtime is necessary. You, your family, and pets can enjoy your yard immediately after application!

For additional chigger protection, we strongly suggest broadcasting Cedar Granules throughout your lawn and garden, especially in the areas where you’re experiencing the most chigger activity.

 

 

This is the big one. After all, none of us would likely mind having chiggers around if they weren’t so keen on biting us all the time. 

Meet the only chigger repellent you’ll ever need: Cedarcide Original. It’s family and pet-safe, and can be used on clothing, footwear, outdoor gear, as well as your cat or dog. Simply apply before outdoor activities like dog walks, hikes, jogs, or backyard time to prevent chigger bites. For best results, reapply every 5-7 hours and after getting wet. That’s all there is to it. 

 

 

The ugly truth is that tick season is never over. 

In most regions, these scary pests can survive all winter long, even in freezing conditions.

Don’t worry, we have your back. Here are 3 tips to prevent potentially life-altering bites and keep ticks away from you and your pets through fall and winter.

Protect Yourself and Pets

Apply Cedarcide Original to you and your pets before walks, hikes, dog park visits, and other outdoor activities to prevent bites.

Need deep woods protection? Try Extra Strength Tickshield instead.

Get a Tick-Free Lawn

Spray your entire yard, shrubbery, and bases of trees with PCO Choice monthly to kill and repel ticks. For larger tick populations, spray twice, two weeks apart, and then monthly after that.

Because PCO is both family and pet safe, you can start enjoying your yard immediately after application.

Check for Ticks  

Ticks removed within 36 hours rarely cause disease or infection. After outdoor activities, get in the habit of checking yourself, children, and pets for ticks as soon as possible (ticks are about 2/3 of an inch, brown or red).

 

Cedarcide Blog Post Image, 6 Natural Bug Bite Remedies

Unfortunately, no matter how diligent you are with pest control and applying repellents, bug bites are still going to happen. That’s just the world we live in. Thankfully, just as there are natural approaches for preventing bites, there are natural options for soothing them once they occur. The next time a bug leaves you with a red, itchy bump, try one of these 6 natural bug bite remedies.

 

Oatmeal

Not only is oatmeal moisturizing and soothing, but research shows it’s also an anti inflammatory capable of relieving skin irritation caused by bug bites. To use: Make a paste by mixing equal parts oatmeal and water and apply it directly to the bite site. Allow the mixture to sit for 10-15 minutes, then simply wipe it off with a wet cloth.

 

Aloe Vera

Bug bites and stings cause your immune system to release compounds called histamines, which typically leads to an itchy reaction. Aloe vera has antihistamine, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties, which can do wonders to relieve this irritation. For this approach: Cut open an aloe vera leaf and apply the plant’s gel to the irritated skin. Reapply as needed.

 

Lemon Balm

Lemon balm, an herb in the mint family, has natural antihistamine properties, which makes it awesome for alleviating bug bites and stings. To use: Finely crush fresh lemon balm leaves and spread liberally on affected areas.

 

Lavender Oil

It smells incredible, improves mood, and to top it off, it also helps soothe bug bites. Take advantage of lavender oil’s anti-inflammatory and antiseptic qualities by diluting it with a carrier like coconut oil and spreading in on bug bites or stings.

 

Ice or Ice Packs

Ice works to calm the itching of bug bites in two ways. Firstly, the cold constricts blood vessels, decreasing inflammation and the body’s natural histamine response. Secondly, the ice will numb the site, reducing the urge to scratch. Using a cloth or similar barrier, apply the ice or ice pack to the bite area. Remove after 5-10 minutes.

 

Chamomile 

When applied topically, Chamomile has restorative, anti-inflammatory effects. In fact, one study found that it both reduces pain and helps lesions heal more quickly. To use: Steep a chamomile tea bag in a glass of water in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes. Squeeze out the water, and apply the tea bag directly to the affected area. Remove after 10 minutes.

 

Cedarcide blog post image, Mosquito Bites: Facts & Myths

Ever notice how mosquitoes tend to bite some individuals more than others? From the sweetness of your blood to what you eat and wear, the internet is abuzz with rumors about what does and does not attract mosquitoes. Well, we’re here to help set the record straight. Some myths, some facts, here are 5 common beliefs about mosquitoes and mosquito bites.

 

Although some studies have suggested mosquitoes prefer Type O blood to others, the vast majority of scientists have disregarded these findings as baseless, concluding instead that mosquitoes are fairly non-specific with their victims. For years, rumors have argued that certain types of blood—sweeter diabetic blood, for example—are more likely to attract mosquitoes, but there’s really no reputable science behind such claims. In reality, mosquitoes need the protein, not the sugar, from their hosts, and so the flavor and type of blood really makes no difference whatsoever.

 

It’s not hard to see how this old wives’ tale probably got started: mosquito bites are much more obvious on fair skinned individuals than on those with darker skin. In fact, those with fair skin readily suffer more intense reactions to mosquito bites, too, only further complicating the issue. But, no, mosquitoes do not prefer one skin tone over another.

 

There are over 3,500 species of mosquitoes on our planet, but not all target humans. Of the ones that do, only females bite, which they do in order to gain the nutrients necessary for breeding. All female mosquitoes that bite humans are capable of transmitting disease, but in reality only a small number of these individuals commonly carry disease. Some species, however—such as the tiger mosquito and marsh mosquito—are more likely to harbor disease than other types, especially when it comes to West Nile virus, yellow fever, and malaria.

 

Research has found that mosquitoes prefer larger individuals to smaller ones, such as adults over children. But why? One way mosquitoes home in on their targets is through carbon dioxide emissions, and bigger humans simply give off more of the gas than their smaller counterparts. Heat also attracts mosquitoes, and—you guessed it—larger people also emit more warmth than smaller folks. This same logic has led some researchers to believe pregnant women might also be more attractive to mosquitoes, as they tend to give off more warmth and carbon dioxide, too.

 

Studies have indicated that mosquitoes seem to prefer people who have more uric acid in their blood, which is increased by meat and saturated fat consumption. Other preliminary research has suggested that mosquitoes might also target individuals with higher levels of potassium and ethanol. Alcohol consumption can increase ethanol and body heat (another mosquito attractant), and studies have seemed to back up the belief that drinking alcohol makes you more appetizing to mosquitoes, too. Meat, saturated fat, alcohol—no wonder BBQs are notoriously good events for collecting mosquito bites.

 

While the details are uncertain, researchers believe darker colors—like black, blue and red—make you more visible to mosquitoes and therefore more likely to be targeted by them. While these colors don’t necessarily make you more attractive to mosquitoes, it’s believed that they do make it easier to find you when other modes of detection—like skin bacteria and carbon dioxide—fail.

 

 

 

Cedarcide blog post image, How to Tell if Your Dog is Overheating

Heat is the biggest risk your dog faces in the summer. Overheating can come on quickly and the results can be devastating, including organ failure, stroke, heart attack, permanent neurological damage, and even the loss of your pet. Understanding the risk factors, signs, symptoms, and how to prevent heat stroke could very well save your pup’s life. Here’s what you need to know about overheating in dogs.


What Does Overheating Look Like?

Overheating, dehydration and heatstroke are fairly easy to spot if you know what to look for. All of the following signs/symptoms are associated with overheating in dogs:

  • Excessive panting
  • Excessive, unusually thick drooling
  • Dark, dry or pale gums
  • Faster than normal heart rate
  • Fever above 105° F
  • Noisy, labored breathing
  • Disorientation
  • Difficulty walking/standing
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Seizures or convulsions
  • Sunken or glassy eyes

What Dogs Are at Risk of Overheating?

Any canine in a hot space can overheat, but some dogs are more at risk than others. Lack of shade, lack of water, too much exercise in hot or humid conditions, and lack of ventilation also raise the likelihood that your pup will overheat or become dehydrated. The following types of dogs are more vulnerable to overheating:

  • Dogs with extremely thick or long coats (but do not shave them, doing so can cause sunburn)
  • Obese dogs
  • Dogs kept primarily outside
  • Senior dogs
  • Puppies
  • Dogs with medical issues, such as breathing problems or heart conditions
  • Dogs with short noses: such as Shih Tzus, pugs, boxers, bulldogs, french bulldogs, Boston terriers, Pekingese

How to Prevent Overheating

Overheating is scary, but the good news is that it’s quite easy to prevent. Here’s how to help your pup avoid dehydration and overheating this summer:

  • Avoid walking, hiking or other exercise with your dog during the hottest times of the day. Go with early morning or evening instead.
  • Ensure your dog has plenty of ventilation, including indoors and when traveling in a car (never leave your dog in a car unattended).
  • Provide your dog with plenty of shade, rest breaks, and water when outside (offer water at least once every hour). Additionally, bring water on every walk, hike or any other outdoor activity you share with your pooch.
  • Keep the inside of your home cool, too.
  • Lastly, closely monitor your pet for the signs and symptoms of overheating mentioned above.

What to Do if Your Dog is Overheated

First thing’s first: At the first sign of dehydration or overheating, move your dog to cooler space immediately. Then, follow these 3 simple steps:

  1. Cool down your dog using cool—not cold—water. A bathtub, shower, garden hose, wet washcloth, pool or natural body of water all work. If using a hose or cloth, place special focus on the head and neck area, and under the armpits.
  2. Offer your dog cool—but again, not cold—water to drink. Let them drink as much as they like. Giving them water that’s too cold can lead to shock and vomiting, which will only make their dehydration and overheating worse.
  3. Lastly, get your dog to a vet ASAP. Even if you feel your pet is now O.K., overheating and heat stroke can cause hidden complications, such as organ damage, blood clots and swelling of the brain. If you feel your dog’s condition is serious (especially if they’re unresponsive), call the vet ahead of time to let them know you’re bringing in an animal that needs emergency medical attention.

 

Cedarcide blog post image, 5 Swimming Safety Tips for Dogs


Swimming is easily one of the best things about summer. Swimming with your dog, however, might be
the best thing about summer! After all, what’s more fun than cooling off while sharing some exercise and relaxation with your pup? But if you fail to take the proper precautions, swimming with your canine can turn un-fun very quickly. Whether cruising the beach, jumping in the pool, or exploring outdoor areas with rivers and lakes, here are 5 swimming tips to keep your dog safe this summer.

Don’t Assume all Dogs Can Swim

Contrary to popular opinion, not all dogs know how to swim. Actually, not all dogs can learn how to swim either. Athletic breeds like retrievers and labs tend to pick it up fast, but denser breeds and those with flat faces like bulldogs and pugs simply aren’t suited for the water (though you’ll occasionally spot an exception!). In fact, according to one popular American Bulldog Guide, drowning is the leading accidental cause of death among both Bulldogs and American Bulldogs—which only shows how closely we need to monitor our pups when they’re playing in or around water.

Similarly, micro breeds like chihuahuas can tire easily, leaving them vulnerable to drowning, especially in natural bodies of waters with waves. If your pup fits either of the above categories, outfit them with a dog-specific life vest or consider skipping the water activities altogether in favor of a safer option like a kiddie pool or sprinklers.

Ask Your Vet About Prevention

Adventure dogs—especially those that frequent rivers, ponds, lakes and oceans—are more susceptible to various illnesses and diseases. If your next outing involves natural bodies of water, visit a vet beforehand. Serious illnesses like Lyme disease and waterborne bacteria like Leptospira can sometimes be prevented with vaccinations. We suggest checking with your vet to ensure you’ve taken all possible precautions before your next water-filled outdoor excursion.

Never Let Them Drink the Water

Drinking salt water can lead to what’s commonly called “beach diarrhea,” a serious condition that can dehydrate or even kill your pup. Pool water contains chemicals, and drinking water from rivers, ponds and lakes exposes your dog to countless waterborne parasites and illnesses—like giardia for instance. Under no circumstance is it a good idea to let your pup drink from unfamiliar water sources, so keep a close eye anytime they approach the water’s edge. Because accidents happen, monitor your pet in the days after water activities, looking out for any signs of disease or infection—such as lethargy, diarrhea, fever, or loss of appetite. If you spot anything suspicious, visit your vet immediately. Quick tip: Thoroughly bathing your pet after swimming can help reduce their chance of suffering a waterborne health complication.

Beware Blue-Green Algae

Cyanobacteria, commonly called blue-green algae, is a bacteria that forms in both fresh and saltwater. Thriving in warm conditions, this bacteria can be extremely toxic to humans and pets alike. Sadly, for our canines ingestion is often fatal. When exploring outdoor spaces with natural bodies of water, always be on the lookout for blue-green algae, which typically floats on the water’s surface (if you don’t know what it looks like, click here). If you come across water covered in what looks like blue-green algae—even if you’re unsure and cannot confirm either way—it’s best to find another spot to play.

Learn Doggy CPR

Even if you do everything correct as a pet parent, accidents can still happen. That’s why it’s crucial that every dog owner learn canine CPR. While brief CPR guides can be found online, we suggest taking a course in person from your vet or a local animal organization for more thorough training.

 

Summer’s here and with it comes one of the best times of year to explore the outdoors with your pup! Swimming, hiking, road-tripping, camping—there’s no end to the thrilling activities you can share with your animal buddy. But summer also presents some unique challenges and health concerns, principally intense sunshine and extreme heat. To keep the fun flowing and emergency vet visits at bay, here are ten Essential Summer Safety Tips for Dogs.

 

Keep them Cool

This is the most obvious but also most important rule of the summer. Here are some quick tips to ensure your pooch stays cool during the summer months:

  • Before walking, hiking, visiting the dog park, and other outdoor activities, consider the temperature and humidity. As a guide, if the humidity and temperature add up to more than 150, it’s too hot for your pup. (For example, if it’s 95°F and the humidity is 60%, which adds up to 155, it’s best to wait till it’s cooler.)
  • Always bring along water and take plenty of breaks when exploring the outdoors.
  • Ensure there’s a shady space and plenty of water when your pup’s in the backyard.
  • Keep your house cool, too (whether through A/C or fans).
  • If your doggo exhibits signs of exhaustion—weakness, excessive drooling, heavy panting, glazed eyes, vomiting—end physical activity immediately and consult a vet ASAP.


Watch Out for Heat Stroke

Typical canine temperature is between 100°-102.5. Heat stroke, which can permanently damage organs and even kill your pet, takes hold around 105°F. So, if worse comes to worse and your pup experiences heatstroke, you’ll need to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms quickly. Your dog’s life could depend on it. Here’s what to look out for:

  • Bright red gums, or gums that appear dry
  • Thick or excessive drooling
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of balance
  • Heavy panting
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Dark stool
  • Lack of urine

If you witness these symptoms, transport your pup to a cooler space as soon as possible and wipe them down with a cool, damp cloth. Have them drink cool—but not cold—water to avoid vomiting, which will only worsen dehydration and overheating. As soon as your pup is stable, visit a vet ASAP.

 

Keep the Bugs Away

Fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes can ruin otherwise enjoyable summer days. To protect your pet from pests and to avoid toxic pesticide exposure, apply a non-toxic, pet-safe bug repellent to your dog when venturing outside this summer.

 

Do Not Shave Your Dog

While shedding  hair can help humans stay cool, our dogs are a bit different. In fact, a dense coat can actually help keep your pooch cool, protecting them from the sun’s harmful rays. Shaving your dog’s fur makes them more vulnerable to a litany of heat-related complications, including heatstroke, sunburn and dehydration. For this reason, avoid shaving your dog during the summer season, or at any time for that matter.

 

Practice Good Hygiene

From swimming to hiking, our pups tend to get much grimier in the summer season. Apart from the unpleasant odor of a dirty dog, poor hygiene can allow bacteria to build up on your pooch’s skin, causing irritation and in some cases illness. A filthy coat can also make your dog more susceptible to biting bugs. As a guide, bathe your pup monthly throughout the summer, more often if they’re adventurers or outdoor dogs (but not too often, over-bathing can dry out your doggy’s skin). To avoid skin issues or exposure to harmful chemicals, always use a non-toxic pet-safe shampoo.

 

Never, Ever Leave Your Dog in a Hot Car

We’ve all heard this before, we all know it, and yet it still keeps happening. Even in temperatures as low as 80°F, your pup can suffer a stroke or perish in a hot car in just a few minutes—that’s all it takes! Under no circumstance, ever leave your pooch in a warm or hot vehicle. No excuses.

 

Avoid Sunburns

Did you know skin cancer is one of the most common kinds of cancer in dogs? And just like with humans, sunburns can develop fast without notice, resulting in serious pain for days, even weeks. Especially if your dog has a short coat, apply pet-safe sunscreen every 3–5 hours when you and your pup go outside. Pay special attention to the ears, belly, and other areas with little to no fur. We strongly suggest using only non-toxic, chemical-free sunscreen options.

 

Protect Your Dog’s Paws

Ever burn your feet on hot concrete? Yeah, it’s no fun, and the painful blisters can persist for weeks. Ouch! Well, your pup is not immune to this condition either. To protect their paw pads from cooking in the summer heat, avoid asphalt, concrete and other hot surfaces (including the metal beds of pickup trucks). To test whether a surface will harm your doggo’s paws, place the back of your hand on the surface for approximately 10 seconds. If it’s too hot for your hand, it’s too hot for your dog. Dog booties are another option for guarding your pooch’s feet during the summer months.

 

Avoid Unfamiliar Grassy Spaces

Avoiding unfamiliar grassy lots can greatly reduce both your dog’s and your family’s exposure to chemical-based pesticides. Many outdoor spaces—such as public parks, local dog parks, and neighboring yards—are regularly treated with these harmful toxins. Unless you’re familiar with the space and how it’s maintained, it’s best to find another place for your dog to play. The risk is simply too great.

 

Closely Monitor Water Activities

From bacteria and parasites in natural bodies of water, to chemicals and drowning hazards in pools, water activities can be risky for pets and pet owners. We’re not saying avoid the water outright—swimming with dogs and visiting the lake are some of our favorite things about summer—but you need to watch your pup closely when in or around water. Monitor your dog to ensure they don’t drink unfamiliar water, including that of creeks and chlorine-saturated pools. Also, be sure to rinse off your pup’s fur after they’ve been for a swim to remove chlorine, natural water contaminants, and to check for parasites like leeches.

 

Cedarcide blog post image, Why You Can Feel Good About Switching to Cedarcide

Did you know over 1 billion pounds of synthetic pesticides are used worldwide every year? Even scarier, over 95% of these chemicals end up somewhere other than their target destination—such as in oceans, forests, drinking water, our food, and inside our homes, pets, children, even breast milk! By choosing Cedarcide, you’re helping combat this worldwide problem, and taking steps toward a brighter, less chemical-dependent future. Here are 6 reasons you can feel good about switching to Cedarcide.

 

From flea collars to yard treatments to personal bug sprays, traditional pesticide use can have a serious impact on you and your family’s health, especially in the long term. Not to freak you out, but many synthetic pesticides have been linked to all of the following health conditions:

By switching to a non-toxic alternative like Cedarcide, you’re helping minimize you and your family’s pesticide exposure. Children and pregnant women stand to benefit the most from this switch. Studies show that children with parents who use chemical-based pesticides are at higher risk of behavior issues, brain damage, lower IQs and several types of childhood cancer. Because of their tendency to put their hands in their mouths and proximity to flooring (most floors are tainted with pesticides), children absorb considerably more pesticides from their environment than adults. And because of their low body weight, our kids are much more likely to be harmed by this exposure.

As public health scientist Miriam Rotkin Ellman has said, “with a pesticide it doesn’t take very much to cause effects that will stay with kid[s] for the rest of their lives.”

 

 

Much like children, our pets are extremely vulnerable to pesticide poisoning. Unfortunately, from flea collars to yard sprays, our pets have countless opportunities for exposure. Choosing naturally sourced yard sprays and pesticides over traditional chemical-based options helps limit that exposure.

Think about it: Your pets live and play in your yard (they sometimes eat its grass, too!). Studies have shown that dogs exposed to lawn pesticides have up to a 70% higher chance of contracting potentially fatal canine malignant lymphoma. Other studies have found that bladder cancer is also associated with lawns treated with synthetic pesticides, with even indirect exposure from adjacent lawns raising your pet’s risk of this cancer. Chemical burns, gastrointestinal complications, organ failure, even death—all have been associated with use of traditional flea and tick medications. In addition to using pet-safe bug repellents, we suggest consulting a vet or holistic vet to find the healthiest flea & tick options for you and your pup.

 

 

A big issue with traditional pesticides is that they contaminate your home and lawn with toxins. Whether used inside or not, pesticides almost always find their way indoors. Pesticides applied to your lawn, for example, are easily introduced inside via windows, vents, shoes, and even your pet’s paws. Studies have found that within a week after outdoor pesticide treatments, pesticide residues are commonly found on indoor surfaces—including flooring, kitchen countertops, and tabletops. By choosing non-toxic options like Cedarcide, you’re helping reduce the levels of pesticides both inside and outside your home, doing a big favor to the environment, wildlife, and your neighbors in the process.

 

Wildlife—especially marine life and birds—have been hit hard by traditional pesticide use. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, over 72 million birds die in the U.S. each year as a result of pesticide poisoning. Because many types of pesticides are bioaccumulative—meaning small, incremental exposures can can build up to toxic levels within an organism over time—they have the potential to disrupt entire food chains, affecting nearly every living thing on the planet.

But what can homeowners like you do to help minimize the impact of pesticides? A lot, actually! The average homeowner uses ten times more pesticides per acre than farmers do on industrial farmland. So in many ways, it’s in the hands of people like us to start reducing pesticide use for the sake of animals and families everywhere.

 

Without you we could not support the causes that inspire us! Animal welfare is one such cause essential to the Cedarcide mission. In addition to supporting animal rescues and founding the Cedarcide Horse Rescue, our team spends a great deal of their personal lives fostering and volunteering for disadvantaged cats, dogs and other animals.

 

Veterans, soldiers, and first responders also play a big role at Cedarcide. These real life heroes inspire us every day, which is why each year we support and participate in Dallas’ Carry the Load March. This 20-hour walk honors military service of all shapes and sizes, with proceeds benefiting corresponding charities.

 

As mentioned earlier, pesticides nearly always end up somewhere other than intended. Wind, runoff, and over-application are the obvious culprits. In addition to wildlife, the environment pays the highest price for this widespread pesticide contamination. But just how extensive is pesticide pollution? According to one study by the U.S. Geological Survey, pesticides were found to contaminate every stream in the United States, and over 90% of all wells researchers tested. Unbelievable, right? By adopting non-toxic pesticides and engaging in responsible pesticide practices—like careful application and avoiding overuse—you can have a real impact on the health of your family and community.