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Can Your Dog Really Smell Other Dogs on You?

 

Have you ever come home after playing with a dog only to have your own dog freak out? Maybe they sniffed you all over. Maybe they even acted a little jealous. As dog parents, we just assume our pups can smell other dogs on us. But is that really true? After some research, we found the answer. Here’s a short guide to dogs’ ability to smell other dogs on their owners.

 

Can Your Dog Really Smell Other Dogs on You?

Turns out our instincts as pets parents are correct: Yes, our dogs can smell other dogs on us. Dogs can detect not only new and unfamiliar smells, but also the pheromones of other canines (which are present in skin, fur, fecal matter and urine). So, the next time you come home after playing with a dog, know that your dog’s onto you. Not only can your dog tell if you’ve been cheating on them, their noses can also discover a lot of information about the dog you were playing with—including their sex, if the dog has given birth, what the dog had recently eaten, where they had recently been, and even what kind of mood they were in when you saw them.

 

Signs Your Dog Smells Another Dog on You

Just because a dog can smell another dog on you, doesn’t mean they have. Here are some telltale signs your pup has picked up on the scent:

  • Excited jumping and other hyper or anxious behavior
  • Intense sniffing that lasts longer than usual
  • Twitching whiskers
  • Wide-eyes
  • Drooling

 

 

How Do They Do it?

A dog’s sense of smell is said to be anywhere from 10,000 to 100,000 more powerful than our own (it’s believed that dogs have between 125-300 million scent glands). In a way, though, comparing a dog’s sense of smell with our own doesn’t make a lot of sense. The canine sense of smell gathers so much more information than ours that it’s essentially an entirely different kind of sense—it’s more like our vision and our sense of smell combined. Sometimes it takes your dog several attempts to sniff out all the information they’re looking for, which explains why they seem to smell you for a lot longer after you’ve been around other canines.

 

Your Dog Can Also Smell You on Other Dogs and People

Experiments into the canine sense of smell have revealed other interesting things. For instance, in one study researchers tested a dog’s ability to distinguish her owners scent from that of other humans. The scientists found that not only could the dog recognize her owners smell from the rest, but they found that her brain’s pleasure center was activated only when she detected her owners smell, not when she detected other humans’ scents. This means two things: First, your dog really really loves you, and second, your unique smell likely reminds your pup of all the good times you’ve shared.

The study also showed that the brains of therapy and service dogs act differently than most other canines. Compared to other dogs, these service dogs’ pleasure centers were activated by contact with nearly all humans, not just their owners. Which, of course, makes sense since they’re trained for empathy and affection. Another study confirmed something else us pet parents regularly assume: Dogs, it seems, actually do get jealous!

 

For more answers to common pet questions (like “Do Dogs Really Dream?”) subscribe to our newsletter.

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page to let us know what you think!

Cedarcide Blog Post Image, What You Need to Know About Mites

What You Need to Know About Mites

Cedarcide Blog Post Image, What You Need to Know About Mites

 

What Are Mites?

There are over 48,000 species of mites. They can be found in almost every corner of the world, surviving everywhere from tropical environments to arid ecosystems, even indoors alongside humans.

Like ticks, mites are both arthropods and arachnids, but unlike ticks, not all mites are parasites. Some—like house dust mites—are scavengers, feeding off the dead skin and hair of humans. Some mites feed on mold and other plant-life. Some are symbiotic, living on the backs of insects like bees. And, yes, some are parasitic—like bird mites, rat mites and chiggers—which feed on the blood or skin of their hosts.

 

Do Mites Affect Humans?

You might be surprised to learn that the overwhelming majority of American homes have mites. The good news is that most mites are harmless to humans. However, there are in fact a few species that bite or pose other health risks to people. The extremely irritating skin condition scabies, for instance, is caused by an allergic reaction to the itch mite, which burrows into the skin of mammals to live and lay eggs. Mange is often the result of the same itch mite, along with another species, the Demodex mite (or eyelash mite), which infests the eyelashes of millions of people each year. The Demodex mite has also been linked to rosacea.

The most common biting mites found in the home are rat mites and bird mites. These two parasitic species prey mostly on small animals, but occasionally feed on humans too, causing dermatitis and acute itching. Another common household mite, the dust mite, is not parasitic and therefore does not bite; however, it’s a leading cause of allergies and has been found to cause asthma, too.

 


How Do You Get Mites?

The two most common biting mites—rat mites and bird mites—enter our homes through wild animals and pests. The former is typically brought into the home by a rodent, while the later finds its way in from nearby bird nests. Dust mites on the other hand live almost exclusively within homes, where they deeply embed themselves in carpets, bedding, rugs and other especially dusty surfaces. In fact, a typical mattress contains tens of thousands of these mites. Even more—around 100,000—can live in a single square foot of rug or carpet.

Perhaps most offputting of all, Demodex mites—sometimes called eyelash mites—make their home in the hair follicles and glands in and around the human eye. People with pets are particularly at risk of contracting Demodex mites, as these insect-like organisms are usually transferred to humans from dogs and cats.


What Are The Signs Of A Mite Infestation?

Because of mites’ near microscopic size, and because they vary so greatly from species to species, it’s extremely difficult to correctly identify a mite infestation. While some mites leave noticeable markings—spider mites spin webs, clover mites are recognizable by their bright red color—most mites leave little to no evidence of their existence.

In fact, the sole sign of an infestation often comes by way of the symptoms mites can cause in humans, such as skin irritation and general allergic reaction. Unless you’re able to capture a mite sample and have it identified by a professional, there’s little to no way to confirm what sort of mite infestation you may or may not be dealing with.

 

What To Do if You Have Mites

While some mites—like the mostly harmless dust mite—are all but impossible to completely eliminate from your home, troublesome biting mites are comparatively easier to treat. Rat mites and bird mites, for example, can often be solved simply by removing any small rodents, birds and bird nests from your home.

If you have mites, but are unsure of the source, fogging your entire home might be a good option for you. If you believe mites have infested your bedding or other linens, washing and drying them on a hot cycle should rid your items of any remaining mites.

Watch Cedarcide’s Fogging Tutorial Below:

 

 

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page and let us know what you think!

Cedarcide blog post image, Do Dogs Really Dream

Do Dogs Really Dream?

Cedarcide blog post image, Do Dogs Really Dream

If you’re anything like us, every time your dog whimpers or twitches in their sleep you wonder: what are they dreaming about? More importantly, do dogs even dream? And If so, do they also have nightmares? As pet parents, these questions have always fascinated us, too. After a little digging, we found some answers. Here’s a short guide to dogs and their dreams

 

Do Dogs Really Dream?

Researchers are confident that they do. It turns out dog brains are more similar to human brains than you might expect. As a result, the dream patterns of dogs are not that much different from ours. Because studies have also revealed that dogs experience the same stages of electrical activity during sleep as those seen in humans, scientists are quite certain dogs do in fact dream.

 

What Do Dogs Dream About?

The subject matter of human dreams is strongly associated with our daily activities. It would stand to reason, the same would go for dogs. Scientists tested out this theory and found “that dogs dream doggy things . . . Pointers will point at dream birds, and Doberman Pinschers will chase dream burglars. The dream pattern in dogs seems to be very similar to the dream pattern in humans.” Just like in real like, your dog’s dreams are full of running, playing and eating. And, yes—your dog probably dreams about you, too. A lot. (blush emoji). Researchers believe that also like humans, dogs probably experience nightmares as well.

Did you know the size, breed and personality of your dog also determines how they dream? Researchers believe small dogs dream more frequently than larger dogs, but that each dream is relatively short, about 10 minutes in length. Larger dogs experience fewer, but also longer dreams. And puppies and senior dogs tend to dream more often than middle-aged canines.

 

 

How to Tell When Your Dog is Dreaming

About 20 minutes after falling asleep, dogs enter REM sleep, the stage at which they begin to dream. If at this point you witness muscle twitches, quiet barking, or eye movement, your dog is likely dreaming. A word of caution, never attempt to wake a dog that appears to be dreaming or having a nightmare. Doing so can startle your pup, causing aggression or even a bite.

 

Have a cute photo or video of your dog sleeping or dreaming? We’d love to see it! Share it with us over Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

 

Cedarcide blog post image, Why Your Dog Eats Poop

Why Your Dog Eats Poop, And What You Can Do About It

Cedarcide blog post image, Why Your Dog Eats Poop, And What You Can Do About It
As a pet parent, few things can shake up your world quite like seeing your precious pooch scarf down some dog poo. It’s just
.well, gross. But don’t worry too much, canine poop eating—also known as coprophagia—is rather common. A recent study found that 16% (or 1 in 6) dogs eat stool consistently, and 24% (1 in 4) try it at least once. It was also found that females are more likely to indulge in the activity, and non-neutered males are the least likely; and overall, most dogs prefer the poo of neighboring pups over their own. But enough with poop statistics, here are reasons your dog’s eating poo, and what you can do to stop it.

Why Do Dogs Eat Poop?

There are many different theories and schools of thought regarding why dogs eat poop. These are the most common:

Dietary Deficiencies
From enzyme deficiencies to a basic lack of nutrition (sometimes caused by parasites, inappropriate diet or underfeeding), dietary deficiencies are one of the leading reasons experts believe dogs eat poop. In other words, these dogs are eating feces as a way to correct an imbalance in their bodies—whether it be a lack of digestive enzymes, insulin or beneficial gut bacteria.

Increased Appetite
If your pup is unnaturally hungry—due to diabetes or thyroid complications, for example—chances are they’ll try poop at one point or another. “Greedy eating,” the behavior of quickly eating food before another dog can get to it, is also believed to play a role in stool-eating.

Cleanliness
It might sound counterintuitive, but it’s believed that dogs have evolved to eat stool as a way of keeping their living areas clean and free of parasites and unwanted bacteria. It also makes sense as a survival trait—if you dispose of feces before it can be detected by neighboring predators or scavengers, your pack is more likely to remain safe and undisturbed. Which explains why mother dogs almost always eat their puppies’ poop if it’s not quickly cleaned up by their owners; they’re simply trying to keep the den clean and their babies safe.

Stress or Punishment
Stress appears to trigger poop-eating in many pups. Separation anxiety, fear, inappropriately long crating sessions—all seem to increase the likelihood that a dog will eat stool. Punishment is a common example: If a dog’s conditioned to fear retribution over potty mishaps, they could be eating their own poop as a way to hide the evidence to avoid getting punished.

Boredom and Curiosity
Lack of stimulation, like being home alone all day, tends to increase the likelihood of poop-eating. When starved of entertainment or company, a pup might try poop simply because it gives them something to do, and—as gross as it sounds—something to eat. This is fairly common, especially in puppies because they’re new to the world and might be trying poop as a way to better understand their surroundings.

Learned Behavior
Like most living things, dogs learn many of their own behaviors by watching elder members of their family or pack. It’s believed that many dogs eat stool because they’ve seen those around them do the same thing.

How to Stop Your Dog From Eating Poop

So you’ve heard the many reasons why your dog might eat poop, but how can you stop it from happening in the first place? Here’s several strategies that might work for you:

Keep a Short Leash and Pick Up Poop Quickly
First thing’s first, pick up any and all poop quickly—including that of other pets you might have, like rabbits and cats. If there’s no poop around, obviously your dog can’t eat it. When out for walks, hikes or dog park visits, keep your pup close, so as to prevent them from hoovering up other dogs’ stools.

Keep Them Stimulated
Keeping your pup mentally and physically stimulated staves off boredom, which, as you read above, is a common cause of poop-eating. Regular exercise, socializing, and interesting toys (like Kongs!) are all essential.

Rethink Their Diet and Address Health Issues
A balanced, varied and nutritionally rich diet is vital to keeping your pup from eating poop. If they’re getting all the vitamins, enzymes and proteins they need, they might just quit their nasty habit. In general, the more raw and organic the diet, the better. We suggest consulting a vet to find a diet that’s right for your pup’s unique dietary needs.

As previously mentioned, health issues like diabetes and parasites can rob your dog of nutrients and therefore lead them to seek out those nutrients elsewhere—like in poop. If your pup commonly chows down on the brown, or if you see signs of parasites in their stool, get a vet to check them over just in case.

Visit a Vet
If all else fails, a vet visit is probably in order, if only to rule out any serious health conditions. They should also have additional tips and strategies to help curb your pup’s appetite for stool.

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page and let us know what you think!

Cedarcide Blog Post Image, Should You Let Your Dog Sleep in the Bed?

Should You Let Your Dog Sleep in the Bed?

Do you let your dog sleep in your bed? If so, you’re not alone. A survey by the American Pet Products Association found that about half of all puppy parents share a bed with their dogs. Whether you do or don’t, you’ve probably heard conflicting opinions about the subject. Some experts discourage pet owners from inviting their dogs into bed, while others argue that the pros far outweigh the cons. We know—it can be a little confusing. To help clear up the matter, here’s what you need to know about letting your dog sleep in your bed.


The Cons

There are three primary arguments against sleeping in bed with your dog: Sleep disturbance, allergies/asthma, and behavior issues. The first is not entirely unfounded. In one survey, 53% of pet owners reported their dogs regularly disturb their sleep throughout the night. Which, in the long run, can have negative health effects. You see, dogs are what’s called polyphasic sleepers, meaning they have multiple sleep/wake cycles throughout the day (humans, by contrast, are monophasic sleepers, meaning one sleep cycle each 24 hour period). These extra periods of wakefulness explain why our pups wake us throughout the night. While studies have consistently shown dogs do in fact interfere with our sleep, other studies, including research by the Mayo Clinic, suggests this disturbance is basically negligible.

Allergies and asthma are other common reasons health experts advise against sharing a bed with your dog. It’s not just pet allergies either. Because dogs are often outside, exploring nature and brushing against all sorts of plant life, they can be a serious source of allergens. The Allergy and Asthma Foundation of America advises allergy sufferers keep dogs, not just out of their beds, but out of their bedrooms entirely. When it comes to allergies/asthma, the issue seems pretty cut and dry: if you have them, it’s probably not a good idea to share a bed with your dog.

Behavior concerns are the last common argument against co-sleeping with canines. While there’s little to no definitive evidence either way, the argument goes that co-sleeping can aggravate dominance and territorial issues, sometimes leading to aggression or even separation anxiety. But it’s hard to know which comes first: the anxiety or the sharing of the bed. Is the dog anxious because they’re sharing our bed, or are we sharing our bed because they tended to be a little anxious in the first place? This isn’t a problem for many pet parents, but if your dog shows aggression towards you or your partner—like growling when they try to come to bed—it might be time to reevaluate your sleeping arrangements.

The Pros

You’ve heard the drawbacks, but what about the positives of sleeping with your pup? Turns out, there are plenty. For one, spending time with dogs naturally increases oxytocin levels in our bodies, a hormone that encourages feelings of contentment and happiness, which might actually improve sleep quality. A dog’s rhythmic breathing, too, is said to regulate and slow the human heart rate, which can be conducive to better sleep. Also, some of us just feel safer when sleeping with our dogs, and you can’t put a price on that kind of security. On a strictly subjective level, sleeping with dogs can be a big mood boost, strengthening the bond with our pups and making them feel happier in the process, too. Not to mention, the snugly comfort and physical warmth that comes with having your dog right next to you in bed is awesome.

 

The Bottom Line

At the end of the day, it’s up to you. Now that you’re more informed, weigh the evidence and make the call yourself. If the pros clearly outweigh the cons or vice-versa, then there’s your answer. If you’re currently sleeping with your dog, and don’t suffer from allergies, have a compromised immune system, or experience behavior or sleep issues, then there’s probably no reason to change things up. Overall though, I think most of us who share beds with our puppers know the goods almost always outweigh the bads, even if we get woken up a few times throughout the night.

 

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page and let us know what you think!

How to Recycle Cedarcide Bottles

Cedarcide blog post image, How to Recycle Cedarcide Bottles

Recycling is important to us here at Cedarcide. Animals, the environment, and future generations depend on the conservation efforts we as a planet make today—and that means the world to us! Because so many of you share our values, we wanted to create a short guide on how to recycle the different kinds of bottles we use for our naturally sourced formulas. Below is a list of our different bottles, followed by a short set of instructions on how to correctly recycle each one. We’ve also included the type of plastic each container is made from by listing its Resin Identification Code.

Thank you for taking the health of our planet seriously!

You can find your local recycling center by clicking here. Additional recycling instructions for plastic bottles can be found here. For tips on recycling everything else, click here.

 

1 oz. Clear Plastic Spritzer (Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate)

1oz.jpg
(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield)

(1): Remove and separate the spray top and lid. Note: The lid is recyclable, the spray top contains metal and therefore can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #1 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

1 oz. and 2 oz. Glass Bottles


cedaroil-texan-2oz.jpg
(Cedarwood Essential Oils)

(1): Remove and separate the lid. Note: The lid is can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): Glass bottles can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

4 oz. White Plastic Bottle (Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate)


csuds 4oz.png
(Vet’s Choice, PCO Choice, Cedarsuds)

(1): Remove the lid. Note: The lid is also recyclable (Plastic #1)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #1 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

Pint Size Clear Plastic Bottle (Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate)


Untitled-design-9.jpg

(1): Remove the lid. Note: The lid is also recyclable (Plastic #1)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #1 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

Pint Size White Plastic Bottle (Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene)


Cedarcide-Original-Pint-470x470 (1).png
(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield, Cedarsuds)

(1): Remove and separate the spray top and lid. Note: The lid is made of a different recyclable plastic (Plastic #5, Polypropylene), the spray top contains metal and therefore can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #2 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure. #5 plastics are less common, consult your local center for best recycling practices

 

Quart Size White Plastic Bottle (Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene)


CedarCide-Original-Quart-1.png
(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield, Vet’s Choice, Cedarsuds, PHL, Scorpion Shield, Scorpion Defense, PCO Choice, Yardsafe)

(1): Remove and separate the spray top and lid. Note: The lid is made of a different recyclable plastic (Plastic #5, Polypropylene); the spray top contains metal and therefore can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (Not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #2 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

Gallon Size Plastic Bottle (Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene)


9dc11d54-9338-468e-95d3-b7774c2bb96b-470x470.jpg
(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield, Vet’s Choice, DAS, Cedarshield, Scorpion Shield, Scorpion Defense, PCO Choice, Ridaweed)

(1): Remove the lid and foil seal. Note: The lid can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics—check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #2 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

Gallon Size Clear Plastic Bottle (Plastic #1: Polyethylene Terephthalate)


Untitled-design-24 (1).jpg

(Petsafe Granules, Homesafe Granules, Campsafe Granules)

(1): Remove and separate the lid. Note: The lid can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics—check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #1 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

5 Gallon White Plastic Pail (Plastic #2: High Density Polyethylene)


Untitled-design-17-e1494276381706.png
(Cedarcide Original, PCO Choice, Cedarshield)

(1): Carefully remove and separate the lid and metal wire handle. Note: The lid is recycable; check your local recycling center to see if they will accept the metal handle

(2): Thoroughly rinse the pail with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): #2 plastics can normally be recycled with curbside pickup—check with your local center to be sure

 

2.5 oz., 4 oz. and 8 oz. Aluminum Bottles


ts2.5.jpg
(Cedarcide Original, Tickshield)

(1): Remove and separate the spray top and lid. Note: The lid is recyclable, the spray top contains metal and therefore can only be recycled with mixed materials plastics (check your local recycling center to see if they accept mixed materials plastics)

(2): Thoroughly rinse the bottle with water until no residues remain

(3): Remove labels (not all recycling centers require this step—check with your local center to be sure)

(4): Check with your local recycling center to find out how your community recycles non-ferrous metals like aluminum

 

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page and let us know what you think!

 

Cedarcide blog post image, How to Apply PCO Choice and Yardsafe When Rain is an Issue

How to Apply PCO Choice and Yardsafe When Rain is an Issue

Cedarcide blog post image, How to Apply PCO Choice and Yardsafe When Rain is an Issue

At Cedarcide, our naturally sourced outdoor formulas are among our most popular products. Our outdoor pesticide concentrate, PCO Choice, and its ready-to-use counterpart, Yardsafe, both help keep your yard free of troublesome pests without endangering your family, your pets or the environment.

While application of these products is rather straightforward (they’re best applied early morning or late evening, and can be used throughout your entire yard to kill and repel insects) there’s one issue that can complicate the process: Rain. We’re often asked questions like these:
 

  • “It rained after I used PCO Choice, do I have to apply it again?”
  • “It rained yesterday, can I apply Yardsafe today, or should I wait till the soil is dry?”

 
To simplify things, Here’s an outline of when and how to use PCO Choice and Yardsafe when rain is an issue:

 

Applying Before Rain

If the forecast is predicting heavy rainfall in the next 24 to 48 hours, it’s best to wait to apply PCO Choice or Yardsafe until after the rain has passed and the soil has adequately dried (moist soil is fine, but soil saturated with water is too wet for application). Similarly, if heavy rain occurs less than 24 to 48 hours after you’ve treated your yard, we recommend an additional application. Note: light to medium rains do not necessitate additional applications.  

 

Applying After Rain

Let’s say it just rained, maybe a few hours ago or the day before. If the soil is dry or only slightly wet, you’re fine to apply PCO Choice or Yardsafe to your lawn. However, if the soil is muddy, saturated with water or otherwise extremely wet, it’s best to wait until the soil has had more time to dry.

 

Additional Guidelines For Applying PCO Choice

Using a Hose End Sprayer, it takes just 4 oz. of PCO Choice to treat up to 5000 sq. ft. of outdoor space. Avoid applications during peak sun hours—early morning or late evening is best. Apply monthly or as needed.


Dilution Instructions

  • Dilute PCO with warm/hot water; shake to mix until milky white
  • For Hose End Sprayers: Add 4 oz. of PCO per 20 gallons of sprayed water (treats up to 5,000 sq. ft. of outdoor space).
  • For Tank Sprayers: Add 2 oz. per 1 gallon of water
  • PCO can be diluted down to 1:1000 for larger, agricultural use

 

Additional Guidelines For Applying Yardsafe

Simply hook up the Hose End Sprayer directly to the bottle, then attach it to the hose and begin spraying. Avoid applications during peak sun hours—early morning or late evening is best. Apply monthly or as needed.

 

Thoughts, suggestions, have your own tips to add? Comment below or head over to our Facebook page and let us know what you think!

Is Cedarwood Oil Safe for Horses?


We love horses here at Cedarcide. So much so, in fact, we’ve rescued 7 of them from kill pens as part of the Cedarcide Horse Rescue. The strength, grace and kindness of these majestic animals is a source of inspiration for us every day! 

 

Horse Rescue (6).jpg5 Fall lawn tips to start taking now-1.jpghotes.jpg

Occasionally we’re asked: “Is Cedarwood oil toxic to horses?” The short answer is No—when properly formulated and properly used, cedarwood oil is not toxic to horses. But there’s more to be said on the topic. Let us explain.

 

Cedarwood Oil And Horses  

It’s important to note that you should never use full-strength essential oils directly on your horse’s coat—that includes cedarwood oil. Undiluted essential oils can be irritating to horses’ skin, and “hot” essential oils—which includes cassia, cinnamon bark, clove, hyssop, lemongrass, ocotea, oregano, and thyme—can actually cause mild burns and rashes at high doses. When it comes to cedarwood oil specifically, some species of cedar—like Western red cedar and white cedar for example—are naturally toxic and irritating, and should never be used in topical horse products.

Full a full list of plants toxic to horses, click here.

 

How is Cedarcide Cedarwood Oil Different?

Firstly, Cedarcide products never contain toxic species of cedar. Secondly, because we only use the highest quality cedarwood oil sourced from pet-safe cedar trees (Juniperus ashei, to be specific), our products are always non-toxic, naturally sourced, and safe for horses. Using a multi-step filtration process, our cedarwood oil is purified of all unnecessary contaminants and other potentially harmful ingredients. However, as with any topical product, we suggest testing your horse for possible sensitivity or allergy to cedarwood oil with a light initial application.

 

How to Use Cedarcide For Horses  

We offer four products for horses and horse owners: Our naturally sourced insect spray, Cedarcide Original, our extra strength insect spray, Tickshield, our concentrated pest control bathing solution, Vet’s Choice, and a ready-to-use formula called Domestic Animal Spray, D.A.S.

 

Tips for Using Cedarcide Original and Tickshield on Horses

We’ve found that some horses dislike being sprayed. For whatever reason, the spraying or spritzing action can occasionally frighten some horses. For this reason we recommend approaching your first application of Cedarcide Original or Tickshield with caution. If you find your horse dislikes being sprayed, simply apply your chosen solution by misting your hands and massaging the spray into their coat.   

If the spraying action does not bother your horse, apply Cedarcide Original or its extra strength counterpart, Tickshield, by misting your horse all over—including armpits, underbelly, and around the ears and tail. Do not spray your horse’s face. Instead, spray the solution into your palms, and apply it to the face using your hands. Regularly treating your horses with Cedarcide Original or Tickshield will kill and provide protection against additional ticks, mosquitoes, flies, mites, gnats, ear mites and other biting insects.

 

Tips for Using Vet’s Choice on Horses  

Vet’s Choice is an extra strength and highly versatile concentrate designed to control insects and parasites commonly found on pets and livestock. Vet’s Choice kill and repels fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, mites and other biting insects. Vet’s Choice can be mixed with water for use as a bath, spray or dip. It can also be used in stables and barns to reduce flying insects, or used as a treatment for mange and several other common skin disorders. 

If you plan to spray your horse directly, use 4 oz. of Vet’s Choice per each gallon of water. For a bath, we suggest mixing 2 oz. of Vet’s Choice per each gallon of water. For a dip, use a 1:200 ratio of Vet’s Choice to water.


 

Tips for Using D.A.S. for Horses  

D.A.S. (Domestic Animal Spray) is a ready-to-use and highly versatile solution designed to control insects and parasites commonly found on pets and livestock (think of it as a pre-diluted version of Vet’s Choice.) Like Vet’s Choice, D.A.S. can be used as a bath, spray or dip, but with D.A.S. there’s no need to dilute beforehand. D.A.S. can be used in stable misting systems to reduce flying insects. It can also be used to treat mange and other common skin disorders.

Tip: D.A.S. works best when animals are thoroughly wetted with the product and allowed to air dry.



 

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